Latest Tri-State News Headlines Updated June 26, 2022 5 AM

Assembly member Didi Barrett instrumental in helping the VIllage of Millerton receive a grant for 4 Multi Modal Solar Crosswalk Signs.

After months of planning one set of these wonderful signs, have been installed at the Harlem Valley Rail Trail and are fully functional.

The other three sets will be installed and functional in the coming weeks. The additional locations will be at the crosswalk near Oakhurst Diner and the S. Center Street intersection, at the crosswalk at the Millerton Movie House and intersection of Dutchess Avenue and the final set, at the newly created crosswalk at the Millerton Library and intersection of Central Avenue.

After months of planning one set of these wonderful signs, have been installed at the Harlem Valley Rail Trail and are fully functional.

The other three sets will be installed and functional in the coming weeks. The additional locations will be at the crosswalk near Oakhurst Diner and the S. Center Street intersection, at the crosswalk at the Millerton Movie House and intersection of Dutchess Avenue and the final set, at the newly created crosswalk at the Millerton Library and intersection of Central Avenue.

State employee retirement wave coming


https://www.rep-am.com/local/localnews/2022/06/25/state-employee-retirement-wave-coming/

HARTFORD – More than 4,000 state employees have already submitted retirement papers this year before more costly pension changes take effect July 1.

The anticipated retirement wave is shaping up to be big, but not the possible tsunami that earlier forecasts warned could see as much as 40% of full-time state employees retire.

State officials are expecting employees will submit retirement notices right up until the window closes so the final number remains to be determined. Meanwhile, Gov. Ned Lamont and administration officials are watching the numbers and waiting.

“Right now, the numbers are up compared to where we are traditionally, but a lot less than the number of people who are eligible to retire,” Lamont said.

The pace of retirements this year is running well ahead of the 1,980 annual average for the last five years. There were 2,656 retirements in 2021, the most in any year since 2011.

What is clear now is that the final count will rival the 4,749 retirements in 2009, the last time that a retirement incentive program was offered under then-Gov. M. Jodi Rell to help close projected state deficits in the billions of dollars. Some 3,800 employees took advantage of the program.

Gillibrand calls for inclusion of a gender inclusive marker on Federal IDs

https://imby.com/post/2961

Third Gender Marker An Important Step Toward Equality For Transgender, Intersex, And Non-binary Americans

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand led a bicameral letter with Senator Baldwin (D-WI), Congressman Ro Khanna (D-CA), and nearly two dozen colleagues in support of a permanent, gender-neutral marker (“X”) option for all federal IDs. Establishing a third gender marker as an option for identification is an important step toward equality for transgender, intersex, and non-binary Americans and will help ensure all individuals can obtain identification that accurately reflects who they are, regardless of gender identity.

Mystery group tosses wrench in Cornwall plans


https://www.rep-am.com/local/localnews/2022/06/24/mystery-group-tosses-wrench-in-cornwall-plans/

CORNWALL — Who are the Friends of Cornwall? People want to know.

With the referendum to vote on a wastewater system approaching, flyers from this group have been sent to 1,500 homes in town urging a “no” vote on the proposal. The same group set up a website and sent email blasts to various residents with the same message.

The movement has raised a stir because of its anonymity and what some say promotes inaccurate information. Many posts on the town’s Cornwall Community Network have condemned a lack of courage for standing behind such convictions.

The plan calls for installing a $6.3 million facility to address the substandard septic systems and wells in the village. A study group working for the past six years believes the upgrades will increase economic vitality in the area, and allow for expansions of businesses and homes.

The flyer states the proposal is not the answer. It states that a soil infiltration system should be considered because it doesn’t deplete groundwater, requires less maintenance, would need a smaller building and less land, and is generally less expensive.

The document states, “The treated sewage with household chemicals, pharmaceuticals and other substances of concern will go directly into the Housatonic River. Not only is this environmentally irresponsible, but if regulations were to become more stringent about what we can discharge into the Housatonic River, the entire system could be deemed noncompliant. … The engineering report contains no data or serious analyses of any alternatives to the proposed sewer system. It is so lacking in crucial information that it has been valued at $7,500, much less than the $52,000 that we voted to allocate to this study in August 2016.”

Another claim is all properties within the sewer district may be required to connect to the system. The study committee has said all along that no one will be forced to connect.

During the Board of Selectmen’s meeting Tuesday, First Selectman Gordon M. Ridgway addressed the issue, saying his phone had been ringing off the hook since the flyer appeared. Residents were concerned it was filled with inaccuracies. He did some research and all he could find was that it was sent by an out-of-town printer.

He contacted the State Election Enforcement Commission and Town Attorney Perley H. Grimes Jr. because of the lack of attribution.

Ridgway then read a letter of response from Grimes, who said assuming Friends of Cornwall consists of more than one individual, he believes it violated at least two statutes: one that requires groups of two or more who produce a communication in opposition to a referendum to include a disclaimer stating who paid for it, and the second requires such a group to register with the town clerk and provide certain information if more than $1,000 is spent trying to influence a referendum.

Upon notification by the town clerk of violations, the enforcement commission is charged with investigating the case. Grimes said the penalty for not including a disclaimer could be a fine from $200 to $2,000 or imprisonment for not more than one year, or both. The penalty for not registering with the town clerk could be more serious, Grimes said.

Ridgway said he doesn’t expect all people to agree, but there are standards to follow in the public eye.

New York Election 2022

June 28 primary

Vote in person on Election Day — Tuesday, June 28

Polls Open:

6:00 am – 9:00 pm

Poll Locations:

Find your polling site at voterlookup.elections.ny.gov

Crime is surging in New York City. But it dropped in the Hudson Valley


https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/local/2022/06/23/ny-data-show-violent-crime-fell-hudson-valley-rising-nyc/7627543001/

Politicians have painted rampant crime as a widespread crisis that has made New York more dangerous, with Republicans blaming Democratic policies for a violence spike.

But new data reported by police agencies and released by the state this month show that the number of violent crimes committed in the seven-county Hudson Valley region actually dipped by 0.7% last year, and was 18% lower in 2021 than in 2017.

Statewide figures from the state Division of Criminal Justice Services do show troubling hikes in violent crime in the last two years in New York City and some upstate cities, including Rochester, Syracuse and Albany. Annual totals also rose in suburban Nassau County on Long Island.

But that was not the case in the Hudson Valley, a region of 2.4 million people that stretches from the urban northern edge of New York City to the wilderness of the Catskills. Total violent crime in those seven counties fell to 3,557 in 2021 from 4,362 in 2017.

Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro, a Republican candidate for Congress in a neighboring district, had held a press conference in Albany two weeks earlier to denounce the latest amendment to bail reform as inadequate, and to demand its repeal.

“Democrats spent the last two years calling cashless bail a success,” Molinaro said in a statement afterward. “I’m not sure how a dramatic increase in violent crime constitutes success.”

USA TODAY Network Hudson Valley asked both Schmitt and Molinaro to clarify which areas they meant when talking about rising crime and to discuss the new data showing that Hudson Valley crime had fallen.

Schmitt’s office issued a statement from him in response that instead cited news coverage and denounced New York’s criminal justice reforms as misguided and dangerous. “Every day there’s another headline documenting the crime epidemic in New York State,” Schmitt said.

Molinaro issued a statement suggesting that Hudson Valley crime tallies had fallen because fewer victims were reporting crimes as a result of state policies, which he said had “demoralized and defunded our police, disarmed our DA’s, and disincentivized law enforcement.”