Latest Tri-State News Headlines Updated August 12, 2022 5 AM

Sharon Selectmen Agree to Move Forward with Comcast Proposal for Partnership to Wire Homes
The Board of Selectmen this week agreed to explore further a partnership proposed by Comcast to build out its network along 27 miles of road in Sharon with 234 premises that have never before had access to its high-speed cable internet services. The proposal calls for the town of Sharon to pay $1.6 million to Comcast to build the infrastructure along the roads and also to connect the homes wishing to subscribe along the new route.

If approved, the project would take six months to complete. It would be the first time that every home and business in Sharon would have access to high-speed, wired internet. This would fulfill the overarching mission of the Sharon Connect Task Force, which formed in Nov. 2019 to explore all the options the town could pursue to get everyone connected.

Comcast proposes to build out the parts of town it doesn’t currently serve within six months of getting all the necessary approvals to attach its wires to utility poles and dig along the roads where there are no poles. Subscribers could choose to receive internet, phone, and cable television over the connection. Comcast will offer different tiers of internet download speeds up to 1,200 Mbps (in varying price ranges). Those who have difficulty affording the service could qualify for a federal subsidy to offset a portion or all of the monthly bill. 

To learn more about the proposal, please attend a Community Informational Meeting on Monday, August 15 at 6 pm. The meeting will be a hybrid, both in person at Town Hall and online on Zoom. Click the button below to register to attend the meeting. (The in-person meeting will follow Covid protocols. Seating may be limited and masks are required.)

A Comcast representative will attend the meeting to answer questions. 
Click Here to Sign Up for Community Meeting
After the Community Meeting, the Task Force will come back to the Board of Selectmen to start the funding process. If the Board of Selectmen approve a funding plan, it would be sent to the Board of Finance for consideration. If the Board of Finance agrees on a plan, that would go to a Town Meeting for residents to vote on whether to approve the deal. 

At the end of March 2022, the Sharon Connect Task Force presented the town with a proposal to build a town-owned fiber-optic internet network that would connect everyone at a cost of $12.5 million. Regardless of the outcome of the Comcast proposal in Sharon, Task Force members will continue to support and participate in discussions for a region-wide municipal network. 

Nuvance going ahead with phaseout of labor and delivery

https://tricornernews.com

SHARON — Christina McCulloch, the new president of Sharon Hospital, said that the hospital’s parent company, Nuvance Health, is going ahead with its plans to close the Labor and Delivery unit and consolidate two critical care units into one. McCulloch was one of several panelists during an online community forum Monday, Aug. 8. The online meeting included a report from the independent monitor that evaluates the hospital’s compliance with its agreement with the state and is required twice a year. During the question and answer session at the end of the meeting, McCulloch was asked if the influx of new families into the hospital’s coverage area as a by-product to the COVID-19 pandemic might make the hospital reconsider the plan to close the Labor and Delivery unit. McCulloch said that while the hospital looks at current as well as historical demographic trends, the new families would not result in “nearly enough volume to drastically change our strategic plan.” 

Passports to close famed Salisbury store 

https://tricornernews.com

SALISBURY — Passports will be closing its antique and gift store on Main Street in September after more than 15 years in the community. Passports was founded by the late Elaine LaRoche in the early 2000s as she was living overseas in Asia and had a passion for sourcing unique items during her travels. In a 2019 article in Main Street magazine, LaRoche noted that she would “scour the countryside and send back containers of Chinese country furniture and vintage items” that would end up in her Passports store and then in the homes of those in the community.

Salisbury Family Services back-to-school assistance 

Salisbury Family Services is sponsoring a back-to-school program effective immediately. Gift cards for school clothing will be provided to children in the town of Salisbury. Families who are in need should call Patrice McGrath at 860- 435-5187.

Cornwall plans a fall forum on housing

https://tricornernews.com

CORNWALL — Housing remains a priority in Cornwall according to a report during the regular meeting of the Board of Selectmen on Tuesday, Aug. 2. Several initiatives are being discussed, with the Housing Committee aiming to hold a public forum in the fall to report and to hear residents’ opinions. First Selectman Gordon Ridgway reported that the committee has learned that in order to have a Community Housing Fund as discussed at past public meetings, there would need to be an ordinance. Any proposed ordinance would need to go to a town meeting vote, Ridgway said.

North Canaan approves variety of ARPA awards

https://tricornernews.com

NORTH CANAAN — Following the recommendations of the town’s American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) Advisory Committee and its report on July 20, the Board of Selectmen gave the list its unanimous approval at their regular meeting on Monday, Aug. 1. Requests for funding from emergency and public safety services aligned with the ARPA guidelines as needs arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The Fire District was awarded $107,929 in funding and the fire company was granted $65,816 and $168,628 for equipment upgrades. Town Hall will see improvement to its air conditioning for $49,120; painting and building upgrades for $31,840; building department computer upgrades for $35,460; and other Town Hall computer upgrades for $18,000. Drainage improvement and blacktopping will be seen at Lawrence Field ($27,022) and at the Roraback Building ($37,176), the latter also benefiting from building improvements. A pole barn project for the town garage was granted $57,500. A grant to provide a new ambulance for the North Canaan Volunteer Ambulance amounts to $194,620, also providing a stretcher and stair chair. A project to install a West Main Street storm drain will receive $35,625 and the Couch Pipa VFW will receive $89,714 for the cost of a generator, roofing and an elevator. The ARPA Advisory Committee is still receiving applications for the estimated $45,000 in ARPA funds awaiting distribution. Its members are: First Selectman Charles Perotti, Emily and Bill Minacci, Matt Devino, Selectman Craig Whiting and Brian Allyn Sr.

Ancramdale Neighbors Helping Neighbors Award Education Grants

ANCRAMDALE — For the past nine years, the Ancramdale Neighbors Helping Neighbors Association (ANHNA) has provided higher education grants to help Town of Ancram students who graduate from high school and then attend an accredited college, community college, or vocational school; full time. These grants are based on need, and intended to help students pay for food, clothing, books, transportation, and other necessities during the academic year. We wish to thank all donors for their generosity and making this program a continuous success. With your help we are able to award six students with this grant. This year’s Higher Education Grant is in the amount of $2,000, per student. This is an increase of $500 over last year’s grant. The increased amount is to help offset some of the cost of inflation, especially the cost of gas. Four students will receive the “Adrienne Memorial Higher Education Grant,” and two students will receive memorial grants that are fully funded by their donors. To date, ANHNA has awarded 62 grants. “The Sally Berg Memorial” is established by “The Family and Friends of Sally Berg,” in her memory. Sally, a long-term resident of Ancram, is remembered for her quick wit and humor and her tireless work with a number of local charitable causes. She was widely loved and admired by many in the community. “The Joey Broder Memorial” is established by Deborah Broder and Bill Walter. Joey Broder, brother of Deborah, passed away on June 12, 1972, at the young age of 17. He was loved and liked by everyone who knew him. He was sensitive, kind, fun loving, and playful. The caption on his high school yearbook next to his photo said: “I’ll laugh a lot,” because he found joy and humor in things both big and small. He had such love and light to give to the world. This grant is awarded to the student who strives to overcome obstacles, seizes opportunity, and finds laughter along the way.

Trump-backed Levy gets GOP nod, set to face Blumenthal in fall

Republican primary voters picked conservative Leora Levy over moderate Themis Klarides to be their party’s U.S. Senate candidate days after former President Donald Trump endorsed Levy in the three-way election contest. A first-time candidate, Levy will now challenge veteran Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal and try to become the first Republican elected to the U.S. Senate since 1982 “You’re making history here. It is really exciting, and this is just chapter one. We’ve got the longer chapter ahead, and I will really need all of you here with me and I appreciated so much,” Levy said in her acceptance speech. Klarides conceded around 10:30 p.m., thanking supporters.

Hottest August ever: Poughkeepsie breaks record for warmest start to month

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/local/2022/08/09/poughkeepsie-august-temperatures-hottest-on-record/65396939007/

Every August is hot in the Hudson Valley.

But in the Poughkeepsie area, no start to August on record has been hotter than this month. The average temperature during the first eight days of the month was 80.9 degrees, according to Joseph Villani, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Albany. That’s the hottest opening eight-day stretch to an August Poughkeepsie has seen since local weather records began to be kept in 1949.

The vision for a W.E.B. Du Bois sculpture in Great Barrington would transform the library grounds into a public plaza

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/great-barrington-web-du-bois-sculpture-black-history/article_f3e6baaa-1822-11ed-be4b-cf12da488c9b.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — A vision for a long-desired sculpture of W.E.B. Du Bois in his hometown would transform the front grounds of the library in memory of his civil rights legacy, as well as his love of books and writing. The installation would also rework a popular spot in front of the Mason Library, turning it into a more robust gathering space.

The W.E.B. Du Bois Sculpture Project on Monday presented one of its new drawings showing a life-size design of a seated Du Bois holding a book, as well as an oval-shaped plaza with marble seating. The changes would incorporate repair of the library steps, which are in need of an overhaul.

The project would tie together the nearby Du Bois Freedom Center, the African American Heritage Trail and Du Bois’ birthplace around the corner. Also, the library will eventually hold Du Bois literary materials that will be donated by The Du Bois Center/North Star Rare Books on South Main Street.

The project’s estimated cost is $323,000. Fundraising is sponsored by the Nonprofit Center of the Berkshires. Houston said the project had received significant donations, but declined to say how much.

AREA WEEKEND EVENTS

 

The town of Great Barrington’s summer concert series at the gazebo behind Town Hall on Main Street continues as Jaane Doe takes center stage on Friday, August 12th from 5:30 to 7:15 pm….all shows are weather permitting. Dewey hall will host “the chorus” Musical Kick Ball event at Sheffield Town Park
on Saturday, August 13th from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm featuring live music, food and a surprise musical guest….pre-registration is required prior to August 12th….to reserve your spot, log on to http://www.deweyhall.org

The grand opening of a permanent Historical Exhibit celebrating the town’s local places and people will take place on Saturday, August 13th at Copake Town Hall in neighboring Columbia county….the free event begins at 11:30 am….for more information, log on to http://www.townofcopake.org

The Housatonic River Music Fest takes place on Sunday, August 14th from 12 noon to 6 pm at the first congregational church park in Stockbridge….this event features local performers, food, a bake sale, an h-r-i educational booth, art exhibits and you can try your luck by purchasing a raffle ticket with all
proceeds going to local and national mission projects….admission is free….

Kent Board of Education finds funds to support second trooper in schools

KENT — The Board of Education has found a way to pay for virtually all of the expected one-year costs of a second trooper, but the Board of Selectmen needs more information from state police at Troop L in Litchfield before a vote will be scheduled. The selectmen received a revised request in writing from the school board Thursday to “pursue taxpayer approval on an appropriation of up to $200,000” to request a second state trooper from Troop L to serve as a school resource officer during the school year and work for the town during the summer. Chairman Scott Trabucco told the selectmen Thursday his board also agreed to request $143,000 of the school’s surplus from the 2021-22 budget from the Kent Board of Finance. This figure is 2% of the operating budget and the school returned $190,000 in unspent funds from the last fiscal year. “The $143,000 will cover the lion’s share of the contract for this year,” Trabucco said, noting that this year will be prorated because of the delayed start in October. The split is projected to be 70/30 with the town moving forward. “We will include this in our budget next budget season (if approved), and we’re asking that you include a portion of it in your budget.”

TODAYS TOWN MEEETINGS, EVENTS

PRIMARY ELECTION – Town Hall Offices CLOSED

Sharon CT
Sharon Board of Education
August 9, 2022 – 6:00pm

Cornwall CT
August 9 @ 5:00 pm EDT
Waste Water Committee – Zoom
August 9 @ 7:00 pm EDT
Planning & Zoning Commission Meeting – Zoom
Via Zoom/Hybrid/ or in person at The Cornwall Library

Kent CT
Kent Sewer Commission Regular Meeting CANCELLED
August 9, 2022 – 4:00pm
Zoning Board of Appeals Regular Meeting
August 9, 2022 – 7:00pm

Hillsdale NY
Town Board
August 9 @7:00 pm-8:00 pm
Monthly meeting in person at Town Hall

August 12 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm EDT
Summer Music Fest & Taste of Cornwall
The Taste of Cornwall on Friday, Aug 12 from 6-8pm on The Town Green Music by Wanda Houston HBH Band Small Bite/Tasting Buffet featuring foods from local farms and vendors Games for the kids Check Park and Rec website for details to come. http://www.cornwallparkrec.org

August 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm EDT
Community Dance – Cornwall Green
Community Dance called by Bob Livingston Contras, Squares and Circles All dances taught and called to live traditional music On the green in Cornwall Village (across from the Cornwall Town Hall) No raindate All welcome Sponsored by Motherhouse and Cornwall Park and Rec Email Rachel grrlgall@gmail.com for more information

THE TOWN OF GREAT BARRINGTON’S SUMMER CONCERT SERIES AT THE GAZEBO BEHIND TOWN HALL ON MAIN STREET CONTINUES AS JAANE DOE TAKES CENTER STAGE ON FRIDAY, AUGUST 12TH FROM 5:30 TO 7:15 PM

DEWEY HALL WILL HOST “THE CHORUS” MUSICAL KICK BALL EVENT AT SHEFFIELD TOWN PARK ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 13TH FROM 10:30 AM TO 12:30 PM FEATURING LIVE MUSIC, FOOD AND A SURPRISE MUSICAL GUEST….PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED PRIOR TO AUGUST 12TH

THE GRAND OPENING OF A PERMANENT HISTORICAL EXHIBIT CELEBRATING THE TOWN’S LOCAL PLACES AND PEOPLE WILL TAKE PLACE ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 13TH AT COPAKE TOWN HALL IN NEIGHBORING COLUMBIA COUNTY….THE FREE EVENT BEGINS AT 11:30 AM

THE HOUSATONIC RIVER MUSIC FEST TAKES PLACE ON SUNDAY, AUGUST 14TH FROM 12 NOON TO 6 PM AT THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH PARK IN STOCKBRIDGE….THIS EVENT FEATURES LOCAL PERFORMERS, FOOD, A BAKE SALE, AN H-R-I EDUCATIONAL BOOTH, ART EXHIBITS AND YOU CAN TRY YOUR LUCK BY PURCHASING A RAFFLE TICKET WITH ALL PROCEEDS GOING TO LOCAL AND NATIONAL MISSION PROJECTS ADMISSION IS FREE

For Dutchess County kids, 4-H is a way of life

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/life/2022/08/04/4h-kids-dutchess-county-fair-2022/65378077007/

The 176th Dutchess County Fair returns to Rhinebeck, Aug. 23-28.

The second-largest county fair in New York, it typically draws more than 300,000 people to the fairgrounds for carnival rides, food, live entertainment, and competitions. Exhibitors vie for blue ribbons in everything from pies to pumpkins, quilts to honey. But one of the more popular attractions each year showcases the fair’s agricultural roots: 4-H competitions.

Over the 6 days of the fair, young competitors will show their animals, ranging from calves to pigs to alpacas, in the fair’s livestock ring to try to win ribbons and medals for all of their hard work.

According to Jane Rodd, a 4-H Program Leader at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Dutchess County, 4-H is a positive youth development program. It offers opportunities for kids to learn skills as far ranging as sewing and photography. The 4-H agricultural programs include beef, hogs, poultry, sheep, llamas and alpacas, horses and goats.

“The 4-H Club Program is an inclusive program where kids of all abilities and backgrounds come together to learn about what they love,” Rodd said.

According to Emma Kron, the 4-H Program Manager for the Cornell Cooperative Extension in Dutchess County, there are 371 4-H members ages 5-18 and 30 individual project-specific 4-H clubs. There are 313 4-H-ers enrolled in animal projects (beef and dairy cattle; hogs; sheep; meat and dairy goats; poultry; rabbits and cavy; llamas and alpacas; horses; dogs; entomology, and beekeeping) and 156 enrolled in general interest projects (shooting sports, gardening, sewing, baking, crafting). There are also 4-H clubs in Orange and Ulster counties, as well.

Author Simon Winchester talks about China, his time as a foreign correspondent and the ongoing changes in the field of journalism

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/arts_and_culture/books/simon-winchester-wit-festival-authors-guild/article_b95447e2-0eb1-11ed-9231-b7582478516b.html

The Authors Guild Foundation will host its inaugural “Words, Ideas, and Thinkers Festival,” Sept. 22-25 at Shakespeare & Company, where it will bring together many of today’s best and brightest writers to explore the theme of “Reimagining America” through a series of thought-provoking conversations, presentations, panels and speeches. Discussion topics include identity and belonging, reexamining history, climate change, the U.S. Supreme Court and visions for our future. Festival attendees will have the opportunity to interact with speakers in Q&A sessions, book signings and receptions. The speakers include Dan Brown, Simon Winchester, retired U.S. Navy Admiral Harry Harris, Geraldine Brooks, Jane Smiley, David Blight, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Elizabeth Kolbert, Douglas Preston, Linda Greenhouse, Nikolas Bowie, Ayad Akhtar and Susan Choi. The WIT Festival is free. Session selections and tickets for hosted dinners are available to Giving Society members. Non-members will be able to select sessions and purchase tickets to hosted dinners beginning Aug. 15. For more information, visit authorsguild.org/the-foundation/wit-festival. The WIT Festival is co-sponsored by The Berkshire Eagle, the festival’s media sponsor.

Upgrades will cause Housatonic water bills to double, as faucets run brown in hot weather

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/housatonic-water-works-co-great-barrington-west-stockbridge-stockbridge-manganese-water-discoloration-haloacetic-acid/article_937c98b2-1505-11ed-95a4-b79c487e590c.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — Typically, hydrant flushing roils the town’s water into something that looks like tea or coffee. This time, it’s the searing heat. Meanwhile, residents in the Housatonic section of town are bracing to pay to fix the ongoing problem with the water supply. Long Pond, the Housatonic Water Works Co.’s source, reached 83 degrees on July 25, according to James Mercer, the company’s co-owner and treasurer. Water that warm dissolves naturally occurring manganese present in the pond, turning brown the water that pours out faucets. The price tag for fixing this and other problems in the aging water supply system? At least $4 million, if it all gets approved. Monthly water bills would double. A customer with a $44.73 bill now will pay $45 on top of that, Mercer informed customers in an Aug. 1 letter.

2 seriously injured after motorcycle strikes car on State Road in Great Barrington

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/crime/2-seriously-injured-after-motorcycle-strikes-car-on-state-road-in-great-barrington/article_ce6e401c-15ad-11ed-8f12-175d37298f71.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — Two people suffered serious injuries when their motorcycle struck a car early Saturday morning on State Road in Great Barrington, according to a news release from the Great Barrington Police Department. At approximately 9:40 a.m., Great Barrington police, the Great Barrington Fire Department, Southern Berkshire EMS and New Marlborough Ambulance responded to 911 calls about the accident, which happened in front of the Sunoco gas station. Authorities on scene determined that a Harley Davidson Motorcycle operated by Kevin Barry of Woodmere, N.Y., struck a Subaru Legacy operated by John Angelini of Great Barrington. As a result of the crash, Barry and his passenger, Gina Barry, also of Woodmere, N.Y., suffered serious injuries. As a result of the initial investigation on scene, Kevin Barry was cited for driving in the breakdown lane and negligent operation of a motor vehicle. He will be summoned to appear at Southern Berkshire District court at a later date.

August 18 at 7pm to the Town Board. Amenia Wastewater Committee

Tighe & Bond, the engineering firm hired by the town, will be presenting the recently completed 2022 Sewer Feasibility Study (https://bit.ly/amenia-sewer) on August 18 at 7pm to the Town Board. Amenia Wastewater Committee members are reaching out to commercial and residential owners in the envisioned district to review the report and encourage support for the next phase.

Roe Jan Library’s Community Picnic Sunday, August 14 12:00 – 3:00 pm

The community picnic has returned! Please join us at at the library for an afternoon of food, music, and fun activities. Come meet new friends and neighbors! In addition to BBQ, beverages, and crafts, each child at the picnic will receive a free book coupon from the Friends of the Roe Jan Library to use at the Friends Bookshop. Plus! Do not miss the live Birds of Prey presentation at 1:00 pm. This event is free and open to the public. See you there!

HEAT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM NOON TO 8 PM EDT SUNDAY…

  • WHAT…Heat index values up to 98 expected.
  • WHERE…In Connecticut, Litchfield County. In Massachusetts,
    Southern Berkshire County. In New York, Eastern Ulster and
    Dutchess Counties.
  • WHEN…From noon to 8 PM EDT Friday.
  • IMPACTS…Hot temperatures and high humidity may cause heat
    illnesses to occur.

Connecticut COVID-19 deaths triple in week-over-week spike

Twenty-eight additional residents died of COVID-19 in the last week, up from nine the week before, as hospitalizations jumped to 352 statewide. The positivity rate remained steady at 11.7%, though local and state health officials say that number should be higher due to the widespread availability of home tests. Hospitalizations have increased by 116 patients since June 30. Cases have increased by 11% from the average two weeks ago. The state has lost a total of 11,130 residents to COVID-19 since the pandemic began here in March 2020.

Harlem Valley scores major county grants

https://tricornernews.com

Millerton, North East, Pine Plains and Amenia are just some of the municipalities in northeastern Dutchess County that were recognized in the $4.6 million worth of Municipal Investment Grant (MIG) awards announced by Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro — the most ever awarded through the county’s nine-year-old program. Thirty-eight projects were awarded funds to help bring them to fruition, with a focus on fire and rescue projects. The goal, according to Molinaro’s office, is to “promote efficiencies and long-term sustainability, agency capacity and capability, shared services and community development, while ultimately generating savings for taxpayers.”

Equus Effect receives grants

The nonprofit Equus Effect recently received two grant awards in support of the organization’s work providing military veterans and others in high-stress environments with essential tools to expand their capacity for healthy, authentic relationships through purposeful engagement with horses. The Torrington Savings Bank Foundation awarded a grant for $7,500 and the Northwest Community Bank Foundation awarded a grant for $2,000 to help build the organization’s programs.

14-unit development proposed Affordable housing forum considers Amenia’s needs

https://tricornernews.com

During a public forum about the dearth of affordable housing possibilities, both to purchase and to rent, and the benefits to community life if a wider range of housing options flourish, about 35 residents gathered to hear a report by the Amenia Housing Board (AHB). It was mainly a time for sharing ideas and finding common ground. Residents gathered in the Town Hall gym on Saturday, July 30, for an informal discussion that proved to be lively, cordial and polite.

Community resource book now available

https://tricornernews.com

“The Northwest CARES Help Book,” which gives information on community resources in the Northwest Corner, is available for free at town social services offices. The contents include advocacy groups, immigration information, credit counseling, domestic abuse, health care, home assistance workers, mental health and addiction services, and a list of important town telephone numbers and websites for the six Region One towns plus Norfolk, Warren and Goshen, and the Dutchess County, New York, Community Action Agency, on the back cover.

Kent Sidewalk Sale Days


THURSDAY AUGUST 4 thru SUNDAY AUGUST 7, 2022
10:00 AM to 6:00 PM
RAIN OR SHINE!

Cornwall, CT

August 5 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm EDT
Free Vaccination Clinic – Library

Free Vaccination Clinic August 5, 11am until 2pm. At the Cornwall Library. For ages 6 months to 11 years and 12+. Please bring a health insurance card and photo ID
August 5 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm EDT

Mid-day Music and Meditation at Salisbury UCC on Aug. 5

The Congregational Church of Salisbury, UCC will present its monthly Mid-day Music and Meditation on Friday, August 5 from 12:00 to 12:30 p.m. at 30 Main Street. The Meeting House doors will open at 11:30 a.m. and attendance will be restricted to one-half capacity. Audience members will be admitted on a first come first-served basis. Masks are optional. For this musical meditation, the church’s Music Director David Baranowski will present a half hour of organ works including Bach’s Italian Concerto BWV 971 and Handel’s Organ Concerto in G minor opus 4, no. 1 HWV 289. For more information, please contact the church office at (860) 435-2442

Rose Algrant Art Show

The 2022 Rose Algrant Art Show will be held August 5 – 7 at the Cornwall Consolidated School. Friday, August 5th, 2-6PM Saturday, August 6th, 10AM-5PM Sunday, August 6th.

Summer Book Signing at Hotchkiss Library

Hotchkiss Library in Sharon annual book signing is tonight 5:30-7:30 at The Sharon Historical Society (due to renovations at the library).

Great Barrington’s Summer Concert Series

The town of Great Barrington’s Summer Concert Series at the gazebo behind Town Hall on Main Street continues as Lee Rogers and Friends take center stage on Friday, August 5th from 5:30 to 7:15 pm….all shows are weather permitting.

Open-Mic Night at the Copake Grange

A live in person open-mic night at the Copake Grange Friday, August 5th from 7 to 9 pm participants are invited to entertain or just come on over and enjoy the show masks must be worn.

The 62nd Annual Sharon on the Green Arts and Crafts Fair

Event Date: 

Saturday, August 6, 2022 – 10:00am

The Annual Sharon on the Green Arts and Crafts Fair is held on the Sharon Town Green the first Saturday in August.  There are typically 60-80 vendors offering original works.  The show opens at 10am and closes up at 5pm rain or shine.  Food services are available.  This is a free event.

Cornwall, CT – Conservation Hero Award

Conservation Hero Award Celebration – Cooley Preserve
Come to a celebration on Saturday, August 6, at 10 A.M. at the Cooley Preserve for Shelley Harms, CCT Executive Director, who recently was awarded the Connecticut Land Conservation Council’s “Conservation

121st Twin Lakes Day

It’s the 121st Twin Lakes Day on Saturday, August 6 @ 12:30 PM on Isola Bella. Races and fun for children of all ages. Open to the whole community. More details in pictures. If you have questions, please reach out to me at saiuvalasit@yahoo.com

Housatonic Valley Association receives national and regional honors

Cornwall Bridge, CT – The Housatonic Valley Association (HVA) received National Garden Clubs, Inc. (NGC) Award of Excellence in May and Aquarion Water Company’s Environmental Champion Award in June. HVA was recognized for its track record of conservation accomplishments and goal of achieving climate-ready environmental conditions across the region over the next two decades.

To help establish watershed conditions that are healthy enough to withstand the effects of climate change, HVA launched three key initiatives: Clean, Cool and Connected, aimed at restoring and protecting rivers, streams, and groundwater; Follow the Forest, aimed at helping partners conserve a connected woodland corridor and wildlife habitat linkages from the Hudson Valley to Canada; and engaging and involving more people and local communities to be a part of the solution.

HVA has saved or helped save more than 20,000 acres of land, with another 50,000 acres needed, and restored several hundred miles of local waterways and wetlands with another 500 miles needed, all leveraged by their 200+ partners. This includes municipalities, land trusts, nonprofits, businesses, and community groups, as well as the thousands of volunteers engaged in river clean ups, plantings, paddle trips, and more.

The Federated Garden Club of Connecticut, Inc. (FGCCT), who honored HVA with its 2021 top Bronze Award, also nominated HVA for the National Garden Clubs award, which is its highest award presented to a non-member making a significant contribution toward the advancement of NGC’s goals and purposes.

Heat Advisory Issued August 02 at 3:30PM EDT until August 05 at 8:00PM EDT by NWS Albany

…HEAT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM NOON THURSDAY TO 8 PM EDT FRIDAY… * WHAT…Heat index values in the mid 90s to lower 100s expected both Thursday and Friday afternoon. * WHERE…In Connecticut, Litchfield County. In New York, Dutchess and eastern Ulster County. * WHEN…11 AM to 8 PM EDT Thursday and noon to 8 PM EDT Friday. * IMPACTS…Hot temperatures and high humidity may cause heat illnesses to occur.

Cornwall, CT
August 5 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm EDT
Free Vaccination Clinic – Library

Free Vaccination Clinic August 5, 11am until 2pm. At the Cornwall Library. For ages 6 months to 11 years and 12+. Please bring a health insurance card and photo ID
August 5 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm EDT

Rose Algrant Art Show

The 2022 Rose Algrant Art Show will be held August 5 – 7 at the Cornwall Consolidated School. Friday, August 5th, 2-6PM Saturday, August 6th, 10AM-5PM Sunday, August 7th

Cornwall, CT – Conservation Hero Award

Conservation Hero Award Celebration – Cooley Preserve
Come to a celebration on Saturday, August 6, at 10 A.M. at the Cooley Preserve for Shelley Harms, CCT Executive Director, who recently was awarded the Connecticut Land Conservation Council’s “Conservation

121st Twin Lakes Day

It’s the 121st Twin Lakes Day on Saturday, August 6 @ 12:30 PM on Isola Bella. Races and fun for children of all ages. Open to the whole community. More details in pictures. If you have questions, please reach out to me at saiuvalasit@yahoo.com

Housatonic exchange program highlighted during FFA picnic

Housatonic exchange program highlighted during FFA picnic

There’s no keeping students in the Housatonic Valley Regional High School FFA “down on the farm.”

Thanks to a robust program with myriad offerings, they travel to places throughout the country, meeting new people and learning about various agricultural opportunities.

Two of those students, Haley Swaller and Alyssa Tatro, were chosen for this year’s exchange program, which had them spend time earlier this summer in the northern central Kansas town of Smith Center, learning about farming in that community of 1,600.

They spoke about their experience during Monday’s FFA Alumni Association picnic at the Jacquier farm in East Canaan. The young women said there is little dairy farming in that area of the country; most farms focus on raising livestock and crops.

That description was reinforced by Hannah Rothchild and Will Tucker, who live in Smith Center and are now visiting the Northwest Corner as part of the exchange program. Tucker lives on a farm where beef and chickens are raised, along with crops. Rothchild, who said she loves to travel, owns poultry and goats. While here, they will visit New York City and see various student supervised agricultural experiences.

During the picnic, recipients of the American FFA degree were introduced. It is the highest award given to members to recognize their scholastic achievements, superior entrepreneurial or ownership projects, as well as commitment to agriculture. Housatonic ag-ed teacher Rene Boardman said the award generally is given to those who are two to four years out of high school.

This year, the awards were presented to Alexa O’Connor, a nursing student at Catholic University in Washington, D.C.; Jessica Serna, a recent Quinnipiac University graduate with a degree in environmental studies who will be pursuing a master’s in sustainable science at the University of Massachusetts; Jada Wilson, who has a bachelor’s in natural resources from UConn; Patrick Kennedy, who has one more semester to complete a bachelor’s degree in veterinary technology and plans to seek a degree in veterinary science; Maggie Baldwin, who is finishing her degree in agricultural business at State University of New York at Cobleskill; and Abigail Silvernail, who works in the equestrian field and mentors young people in horsemanship.

Following years of effort by the town’s broadband task force to find a way to provide internet access for every home and business, the Board of Selectmen considered a recent proposal from Comcast at its regular meeting on Tuesday, July 26. The selectmen agreed that the Broadband Task Force could schedule a public information hearing to be held on Monday, August 15, beginning at 6 p.m. at Town Hall. If town residents are in support of the proposal, then the task force would return to the selectmen to being the process of devising a way to fund the project. The project would then go on to the Board of Finance for review and eventually, a Town Meeting would be called for voters to decide. Under the proposal, Comcast would partner with the town to provide high-speed cable to underserved homes, thereby ensuring that every home and business has access to internet service.  
Salisbury selectmen oppose hospital cuts  

Internet Meeting For Sharon

https://tricornernews.com

Following years of effort by the task force to find a way to provide internet access for every home and business, the Board of Selectmen considered a recent proposal from Comcast at its regular meeting on Tuesday, July 26.The selectmen agreed that the Broadband Task Force could schedule a public information hearing to beheld on Monday, August 15,beginning at 6 p.m. at Town Hall .If town residents are in support of the proposal, then the task force would return to the selectmen to being the process of devising a way to fund the project. The project would then go on to the Board of Finance for review and eventually, a Town Meeting would be called for voters to decide. Under the proposal, Comcast would partner with the town to provide high-speed cable to underserved homes ,thereby ensuring that every home and business has access to internet service.  

Salisbury Selectmen come out against Sharon Hospital cuts

https://tricornernews.com

SALISBURY — The Board of Selectmen met Monday, Aug. 1, and agreed to sign a statement opposing proposed changes at Sharon Hospital. The statement reads, in part: “We cannot support the termination of the Labor and Delivery unit and are concerned about changes to the ICU. We believe that the decision to terminate the Labor and Delivery unit, and associated surgical capability, may put expecting mothers at serious risk due to lengthy alternative travel times and this is inconsistent with regional efforts to promote and expand women’s (and men’s) reproductive health.”  

 Equus Effect receives grants 

The nonprofit Equus Effect recently received two grant awards in support of the organization’s work providing military veterans and others in high-stress environments with essential tools to expand their capacity for healthy, authentic relationships through purposeful engagement with horses. The Torrington Savings Bank Foundation awarded a grant for $7,500 and the Northwest Community Bank Foundation awarded a grant for $2,000 to help build the organization’s programs.  

14-unit development proposed Affordable housing forum considers Amenia’s needs 

https://tricornernews.com

During a public forum about the dearth of affordable housing possibilities, both to purchase and to rent, and the benefits to community life if a wider range of housing options flourish, about 35 residents gathered to hear a report by the Amenia Housing Board (AHB). It was mainly a time for sharing ideas and finding common ground. Residents gathered in the Town Hall gym on Saturday, July 30, for an informal discussion that proved to be lively, cordial and p   

Harlem Valley scores major county grants

https://tricornernews.com

 Millerton, North East, Pine Plains and Amenia are just some of the municipalities in northeastern Dutchess County that were recognized in the $4.6 million worth of Municipal Investment Grant (MIG) awards announced by Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro — the most ever awarded through the county’s nine-year-old program. Thirty-eight projects were awarded funds to help bring them to fruition, with a focus on fire and rescue projects. The goal, according to Molinaro’s office, is to “promote efficiencies and long-term sustainability, agency capacity and capability, shared services and community development, while ultimately generating savings for taxpayers.”  

Community resource book now available 

https://tricornernews.com

“The Northwest CARES Help Book,” which gives information on community resources in the Northwest Corner, is available for free at town social services offices. The contents include advocacy groups, immigration information, credit counseling, domestic abuse, health care, home assistance workers, mental health and addiction services, and a list of important town telephone numbers and websites for the six Region One towns plus Norfolk, Warren and Goshen, and the Dutchess County, New York, Community Action Agency, on the back cover.  

Mid-day Music and Meditation at Salisbury UCC on Aug. 5 

The Congregational Church of Salisbury, UCC will present its monthly Mid-day Music and Meditation on Friday, August 5 from 12:00 to 12:30 p.m. at 30 Main Street. The Meeting House doors will open at 11:30 a.m. and attendance will be restricted to one-half capacity. Audience members will be admitted on a first come first-served basis. Masks are optional. For this musical meditation, the church’s Music Director David Baranowski will present a half hour of organ works including Bach’s Italian Concerto BWV 971 and Handel’s Organ Concerto in G minor opus 4, no. 1 HWV 289. For more information, please contact the church office at (860) 435-2442  

New York tax relief hope shrinks in wake of federal climate change deal

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/local/2022/08/03/new-york-salt-tax-relief-hope-impacted-by-inflation-reduction-act/65389959007/

The climate change deal brewing in Congress, which would fund the massive investment in clean energy with new taxes on corporations, came with some collateral damage in New York.

The longstanding hope for repeal of the Trump-era cap on federal deductions for state and local taxes didn’t make the cut in the Democratic effort to find consensus on a massive spending program to cut carbon emissions and extend subsidies for the Affordable Care Act.

The bill would provide billions in home energy rebates for energy-efficient homes with heat pumps and rooftop solar panels as well as tax credits for new and used electric cars. It would usher in major investments in US manufacturing for wind turbines, solar panels and electric vehicles. There’s $3 billion to electrify the US Postal Service fleet and $6 billion for environmental justice and neighborhood grants.

News of the Democrats’ bill broke last week, with Sen. Charles Schumer, D-New York, striking an agreement with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-West Virginia, on the measure. Schumer, however will need the support of all 50 in the Democratic Senate caucus, including Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Arizona, who has been silent about the measure since the Manchin-Schumer agreement was announced.

News of the Democrats’ bill broke last week, with Sen. Charles Schumer, D-New York, striking an agreement with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-West Virginia, on the measure. Schumer, however will need the support of all 50 in the Democratic Senate caucus, including Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Arizona, who has been silent about the measure since the Manchin-Schumer agreement was announced.

The Democrats also await a ruling from the Senate parliamentarian on whether the proposal can avoid the filibuster, which would require 10 Republicans to join the 50 Democrats to pass it, or allow it to be treated as a reconciliation bill that would require a simple majority on the spending measure.

Pedestrian escapes serious injury Tuesday in a Great Barrington crosswalk

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/great-barrington-crosswalk-danger/article_2d04c586-1286-11ed-b2d6-03d74eda7f64.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — A pedestrian Tuesday escaped serious injury when he was struck by a car as he attempted to cross Bridge Street near the Berkshire Food Co-op.

The man was in the crosswalk when he was hit, Great Barrington Police Chief Paul Storti said in a news release. The pedestrian suffered “non-life-threatening injuries to his lower leg” and was taken by ambulance to Fairview Hospital.

Gloria Spector, 83, of Monterey, was cited for the accident. She was driving a 2008 Nissan when the car struck the man just after noon.

The crosswalk accident comes as officials and residents debate the safety of Main Street crosswalks, after a number of pedestrian accidents and close calls over the years. Officials recently voted to fortify those crosswalks with beacons and islands, but stopped short of tapering the four lanes to three.


ATTORNEY GENERAL TONG ANNOUNCES NATIONWIDE ANTI-ROBOCALL LITIGATION TASK FORCE

(Hartford, CT) — Attorney General William Tong today announced the formation of a nationwide Anti-Robocall Litigation Task Force of 50 states to investigate and take legal action against the telecommunications companies responsible for bringing a majority of foreign robocalls into the United States. This bipartisan nationwide Task Force has one goal: to cut down on illegal robocalls.

Connecticut is among 16 states on the Executive Committee leading this task force.

In its first act today, the Task Force issued 20 civil investigative demands to 20 gateway providers and other entities that are allegedly responsible for a majority of foreign robocall traffic. Gateway providers that bring foreign traffic into the U.S. telephone network have a responsibility to ensure the traffic is legal, but these providers are not taking sufficient action to stop robocall traffic. In many cases, they appear to be intentionally turning a blind eye in return for steady revenue. The Task Force will focus on the bad actors throughout the telecommunications industry, to help reduce the number robocalls that Connecticut residents receive and benefit the companies that are following the rules.

“Robocalls are an intrusive and obnoxious menace, responsible for $29.8 billion in fraud last year alone. Our Anti-Robocall Litigation Task Force will shut down the telecom fraud highway and bringing these scammers to justice. In our first action today, we have issued 20 civil investigative demands demanding comprehensive records from gateway providers we believe may be responsible for the vast majority of unlawful foreign robocall traffic into the United States. If these telecom bad actors cannot police themselves, our Task Force will,” said Attorney General Tong.

According to the National Consumer Law Center and Electronic Privacy Information Center, over 33 million scam robocalls are made to Americans every day. These scam calls include Social Security Administration fraud against seniors, Amazon scams against consumers, and many other scams targeting all consumers, including some of our most vulnerable citizens. An estimated $29.8 billion dollars was stolen through scam calls in 2021. Most of this scam robocall traffic originates overseas. The Task Force is focused on shutting down the providers that profit from this illegal scam traffic and refuse to take steps to otherwise mitigate these scam calls. 

Metro-North Railroad union: Drop the mask mandate now so we don’t get attacked

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/07/29/metro-north-biggest-union-wants-to-ease-mask-mandate-trains/65385897007/

Metro-North’s biggest union wants the state to ease mask mandates on the commuter rail amid a series of angry confrontations between conductors and passengers upset about having to wear a mask.

In recent weeks, passengers have spit on and assaulted conductors after being told they would need to put on a mask, Edward Valente, the general chairman of the Association of Commuter Rail Employees, said.

The incidents have surged as local governments and other transportation agencies make mask-wearing optional, giving passengers the message that they don’t have to wear a mask in public, Valente said.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Metro-North’s parent agency, has followed guidance from the state Department of Health endorsed by Gov. Kathy Hochul, keeping in place a mandate from the early days of the pandemic.

“Obviously it comes from a good place,” Valente said. “But at this point in the pandemic, we’re on an island and it’s doing more harm than good. Mask optional is the way to go.”

Other MTA agencies, including the Long Island Rail Road and city subways are also required to follow the mask mandate. Empire State Excellence in Teaching Award. She was joined by 53 other P-12 public school teachers who were rewarded for their impressive skillset as an educator and commitment to success for all of their students.

Empire State Excellence In Teaching Award

Webutuck School District Congratulations to Monica Baker, one of the recipients of the Empire State Excellence in Teaching Award. She was joined by 53 other P-12 public school teachers who were rewarded for their impressive skillset as an educator and commitment to success for all of their students.

Twin Lakes Day

It’s the 121st Twin Lakes Day on Saturday, August 6 @ 12:30 PM on Isola Bella. Races and fun for children of all ages. Open to the whole community. More details in pictures. If you have questions, please reach out to me at saiuvalasit@yahoo.com.

A plane lost power on takeoff in Great Barrington, forcing the pilot to land in a field

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/crime/plane-lost-power-on-takeoff-in-great-barrington/article_1d6f8c06-11a9-11ed-8051-6373efc489de.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — A flight instructor and student made an emergency landing in a field over the weekend after their airplane’s engine lost some of its power on takeoff at Walter J. Koladza Airport.

Neither were injured, and the plane did not sustain any damage, said Great Barrington Police Chief Paul Storti.

“It wasn’t a plane crash,” he added. “It landed.”

Storti said the engine trouble happened sometime before 5 p.m. Saturday.

The airport notified the Federal Aviation Administration, which investigated the incident Monday morning, said the airport’s owner, Richard Solan. The agency confirmed the partial power loss and noted the lack of damage. There were no fuel leaks on the airport’s 1978 Piper Warrior, and the plane’s engine had about 1,200 hours before a recommended overhaul at 2,000 hours, he said.

Solan said he was instructing a student when the power faltered, and he decided to land as a precaution in a stretch of private fields just west of the runway that is considered an “overrun” in such cases. The airport trims trees and cuts tall grass on either end of the runway to keep the clearing in case of just such an event, Solan noted. The fields are behind some of the homes that sit along Route 71 to the west.

“It was a split-second decision, and there was the heat [outside] and the safest maneuver was to land it,” he said.

Solan, a retired, longtime American Airlines pilot, explained that every pilot and student prepares for this on every flight. It’s part of a checklist, and the maneuvers instilled in students.

Connecticut State budget surplus higher than expected

Official: State budget surplus higher than expected

State Comptroller Natalie Braswell is now projecting the state ended the last fiscal year with a $4.3 billion budget surplus.

Braswell also advised that the surplus can be expected to increase because revenue received through Friday will continue to accrue to the 2022 fiscal year that ended July 1.

The comptroller’s office calculates that approximately $1 billion in general fund revenue remains outstanding at this time. The general fund is the largest of the appropriated funds that make up the state budget, and it finances most state government operations.

The updated surplus projection represents a $231 million increase from the comptroller’s July 1 estimate, due to a net increase of $157 million in revenue and a net decrease in expenditures of $73.3 million.

State law requires slightly more than $3 billion in state income tax receipts be transferred to the budget reserve fund. This will leave an operating surplus of more than $1.2 billion.

Braswell said the budget reserve fund will have a record balance of more than $7.4 billion when the income tax receipts and the operating surplus are transferred to the fund.

NY COVID cases down 15%, but hospitalizations, deaths up amid lingering BA.5 wave impact

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/08/01/ny-covid-cases-down-but-hospitalizations-deaths-rise/65387987007/

New York’s weekly COVID-19 case tally fell 15% last week, signaling the latest omicron BA.5 subvariant wave was receding despite increases in hospitalizations and deaths, which typically lag behind infections.

New York reported 44,235 new cases in the week ending Sunday, down from the previous week’s tally of 52,115 cases.

New York ranked 28th among the states where coronavirus was spreading the fastest on a per-person basis, a USA TODAY Network analysis of Johns Hopkins University data shows.

Nationally, COVID-19 cases increased about 7% from the week before, with 906,593 cases reported. Across the country, 28 states had more cases in the latest week than they did in the week before.

In New York, the number of COVID-19 patients admitted per week to hospitals statewide has increased about 25% over the past month, including about 4,300 patients admitted last week. A total of 173 New Yorkers died due to COVID-19 in the week ending Sunday − up from 162 deaths the prior week − and New York’s overall pandemic death toll topped 70,000 in a stark reminder of the virus’ continued threat.

Hudson’s Ribs & Fish is closing after 33 years

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/life/food/2022/07/29/hudson-ribs-fish-close-new-restaurant-odo/65385234007/

On Aug. 1, after 33 years, Hudson’s Ribs & Fish in Fishkill is closing its doors for good. But the closure will make way for a new restaurant that will open in its place.

Original owners Regina and Sam Bei announced in August 2021 they were selling the popular surf-and-turf restaurant, and it reopened that month under the ownership of the Bucolli family.

Now the Bucollis are closing Hudson Ribs & Fish and reopening in mid-September as Oda Restaurant. The family recently opened a wine bar and lounge called BarVino, which was once the original restaurant’s event space.

“When (BarVino) opened, we were going to renovate the main dining area,” said Tony Bucolli, one of the owners. “We love this place but it needs a little upgrade. The initial idea was to renovate it and, as we discussed the idea, we came to the conclusion to change the name, too, and start fresh.”

While the main restaurant area is under construction, BarVino will remain open to customers. The wine bar and lounge opened on July 20 and offers an array of wine and cocktails, as well as tapas including oysters, filet mignon carpaccio, spicy tuna, short rib sliders and more.

Once open, Oda Restaurant will offer “new American cuisine,” according to Bucolli. He explained that an “oda” is an Albanian term referring to a type of guest room where “everyone is welcome.”

Kent man faces assault charges after incident with girlfriend

Kent man faces assault charges after incident with girlfriend

Responding to screams coming from a car that drew the attention of several onlookers along West Cornwall Road in Sharon on Thursday night, state police said they were confronted by an angry and intoxicated Timothy Unwin.

Unwin, 42, of 5 Mountain View Road, Kent, had beaten and dragged his girlfriend of three months from the car they were traveling in, police allege. The pair had argued over who would drive home after a swim in the Housatonic River at about 10:30 p.m.

Arrested on charges of third-degree assault, interfering and disorderly conduct, Unwin was held on $100,000 bond overnight at Troop B in Canaan. Arraigned Friday in Torrington Superior Court, his bond was lowered to $85,000 and he posted it. A protective order was issued requiring him to have no contact with his alleged victim.

Unwin has a history of arrest for multiple counts of drunken driving, failure to appear, sixth-degree larceny and violation of probation.

Kent selectmen put off discussing rooster flap

KENT – The Board of Selectmen is facing the first time the town’s right-to-farm ordinance has been confronted with a complaint about noise from a rooster. The ordinance directs the board to mediate complaints, but instead of discussing the merits of the complaint Thursday, First Selectman Jean Speck said she would consult with the town attorney. Residents Doug Wynn and Victor Lewis have made a noise complaint against a rooster that lives next door to them on Kent Cornwall Road owned by Albert Loverro. The town ordinance, enacted in 2015, states that if a dispute arises between an agricultural operator and a resident about when an “agricultural operation constitutes a nuisance, either interested party may submit a written request to the selectmen for an advisory opinion or to mediate the dispute.”

Speck turned to land use administrator Donna Hayes for guidance about how to handle the complaint. Hayes explained multiple times that roosters are allowed in the rural zone. Hayes said the zoning regulations could be changed, but this would impact “98% of the town,” Hayes said, noting she didn’t know if the PZC would support that. Kent’s history of farming stretches back to the very beginnings of the town, which has a current population of about 3,000. The zoning regulations were changed in 2018, and language referring to farming and farm stands was strengthened. Farming one’s land is a right without any permits required.

Port Authority OKs $28M to fix aging NYC bus terminal, even as it plans replacement

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/transportation/2022/07/28/port-authority-repair-midtown-bus-terminal-new-york-city/65384802007/

The age of the 71-year-old Port Authority Bus Terminal is showing — and it is costing the agency tens of millions of dollars to maintain the midtown Manhattan station until a replacement is built. The board of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey on Thursday approved $27.8 million in spending to reinforce and monitor a nearly 60-year-old concrete truss structure that supports three parking levels at the terminal. “The proposed project would provide for in-depth inspections, cleaning and repairs to elements of the truss system to ensure that the existing terminal is maintained in a state of good repair for its remaining life,” the board’s agenda explained. “Regular inspections detected concerns, and that is what put the project on the schedule.” Port Authority Executive Director Rick Cotton said at the board’s meeting in lower Manhattan. The bus terminal, at 42nd Street and Eighth Avenue, was one of the busiest stations in the world pre-pandemic, but the Port Authority’s plans to replace it have dragged on since it was deemed obsolete eight years ago. The bistate agency unveiled plans last year to replace the dilapidated and crowded transit hub. The proposal, laid out in a draft environmental report to the Federal Transit Administration, calls for razing the building and erecting a replacement at the existing location along with an additional bus storage depot on the west side of Ninth Avenue. That depot would also serve commuters temporarily during construction.

Newly shared evidence and illness lead to delay in embezzlement trial of former Great Barrington official

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/crime/trial-of-former-great-barrington-town-employee-accused-of-embezzling-funds-delayed/article_eb5f5fa6-0f60-11ed-84cd-83a546aaf1d7.html

PITTSFIELD — The former Great Barrington employee charged with embezzling more than $150,000 will go on trial this fall — not next week — after her attorney said she needed to review material provided this month by prosecutors. Attorney Judith Knight filed an emergency motion in Berkshire Superior Court this week to continue the trial of her client, Deborah Ball, to Oct. 1 or later. She said prosecutors provided her with additional information related to the case July 19. “I filed a motion to continue because the commonwealth had just recently provided me with a lot of documents that they’ve had since the beginning of the case in 2019, but they just gave them to me this past week,” Knight told The Eagle. “I need to go through those because I think some of those will be helpful to my client.” She said different prosecutors had been assigned to handle the case, which may have had something to do with what she termed a late disclosure of potential evidence. In addition, Ball, who is 66, is facing medical issues. The new materials, provided through what’s known as the discovery process, included police reports and accounting information from Scanlon & Associates, the firm whose 2018 audit caught discrepancies in accounts handled by Ball, the town’s former assistant treasurer/collector.

State Supreme Court to hold hearing on school mask mandate

State Supreme Court to hold hearing on school mask mandate

HARTFORD — The state Supreme Court has slated oral arguments on the fate of a constitutional challenge to school mask mandates for early September, just after the start of the new school year. The legal battle commenced in August 2020 when a group of parents opposed to mask requirements in schools and the Freedom Alliance of Connecticut sued Gov. Ned Lamont and then-Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona to block enforcement of a school mask mandate. The Supreme Court has scheduled oral arguments for Sept. 7 on a defense motion to dismiss the appeal because the statewide order was lifted Feb. 28 and decision-making returned to the local level. Lawyers for the parents and Freedom Alliance of Connecticut are arguing the appeal is not moot because of the possibility that a statewide mask mandate could be reinstated, including to cope with new coronavirus variants. Lamont declared another public health emergency June 28 that affords the governor the ability to authorize another school mask mandate for students, staff and visitors. The declaration will expire Dec. 28 or upon the end of the ongoing federal public health emergency, whichever is earlier. Lamont has insisted he has no plans to issue emergency orders, and he issued the latest declaration for the limited purposes of maintaining the state’s eligibility for federal coronavirus relief funds for food assistance and housing for the homeless. Lamont said Friday this remains his position a month later, and he continues to believe school districts should make decisions on COVID-19 safety protocols. He also reported the state Department of Education will be releasing updated guidance for the 2022-23 school year next week.

NY accuses CVS of diverting millions from safety net hospitals, harming patient care

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/health/2022/07/29/ny-sues-cvs-for-allegedly-diverting-millions-safety-net-hospitals/65385868007/

New York prosecutors on Thursday accused CVS of diverting millions of dollars from low-income and medically underserved communities in New York as part of a scheme that violated antitrust laws. The lawsuit alleged pharmacy giant CVS illegally required New York safety net hospitals and clinics to exclusively use a CVS-owned company, Wellpartner, to process and obtain federal subsidies on prescriptions filled at CVS pharmacies. CVS’s alleged scheme forced safety net health care providers to incur millions of dollars in additional costs, while CVS continued to benefit through its subsidiary, New York Attorney General Letitia James said in a statement Thursday.

Berkshire Mall sells for $8 million. Cannabis mini-farms are planned for former Sears and Macy’s stores

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/central_berkshires/berkshire-mall-cannabis-cultivation/article_5ffd5690-0f81-11ed-8390-5b173da51eb8.html

LANESBOROUGH — A network of indoor cannabis farms is poised to replace long-gone commerce at former anchor stores at the Berkshire Mall. The Lanesborough Select Board this week agreed to begin negotiations for a Host Community Agreement with JMJ Holdings Corp., a Massachusetts outfit that seeks to buy the shuttered mall and build out its former commercial spaces as cannabis farms. Blake M. Mensing, the “M” in the corporation’s name, told officials in Lanesborough that he and partners are close to acquiring the mall. They plan to transform old stores into high-tech zones for cannabis cultivation, by other parties attracted to a project that’s already obtained permits and licenses. On Friday, a sale of the mall property for $8 million was recorded. The seller was Durga Property Holdings Inc., which has owned the mall since 2019. The buyer is Mehran Namiri-Kalantari of Santa Monica, Calif., according to records filed with the Northern Berkshire Registry of Deeds. It is not clear from available property records what the relationship is, if any, between Namiri-Kalantari and JMJ Holdings Corp. Local officials said this week that residents of Lanesborough will have chances to comment on the project down the road, including at a required community outreach meeting that is not yet scheduled, as well as at public hearings during requested zoning reviews. The board indicated that it had received and reviewed a copy of a purchase-and-sale agreement between JMJ Holdings Corp. and the mall’s current owner.

Salisbury Town Meeting votes in favor of access to proposed affordable housing right of way

At last nights Salisbury town meeting at the Congregational Church of Salisbury, a vote was taken to give the Salisbury Housing Committee access to the property by using a short section of less than one-half the width of the 66-foot-wide retired railroad corridor.. The approval was given by a vote of 291 YES and 50 NO. The required distance is less than 150 feet from the end of the pavement on Railroad Street (400 feet from the intersection of Fowler Street). The vote was necessary because the access is on Town property, and required Town Meeting approval.

Man gets probation for setting fire to his former ‘Wonderful Things’ store in Great Barrington

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/crime/man-pleads-guilty-to-setting-fire-at-great-barrington-building/article_5a3918be-0e98-11ed-afa5-f3a30eac486b.html

An 86-year-old man pleaded guilty Thursday to setting ablaze the site of his former “Wonderful Things” yarn store in south county last summer. He was sentenced to two years of probation and fined $5,000. Harry Sano Jr. admitted in Berkshire Superior Court to charges he set fire to 232 Stockbridge Road in Great Barrington on July 7, 2021. Sano set the blaze, Assistant District Attorney Joseph Yorlano said, while a sale was pending to a buyer who planned to tear down the structure. A $750,000 insurance claim was filed for the fire, Yorlano said, signed by Sano’s wife. But the prosecutor said there’s no evidence that Sano’s wife of 62 years knew what her husband had done believing he had gone to the library the day of the fire. Sano and his wife used to own the yellow, three-story structure once home to the eclectic retail store for fiber and yarn, with several housing units upstairs. In court Thursday, the Judge said he wrestled with this case, having trouble squaring how “someone who has navigated life so well” and had been so successful made the decision to set the fire. “You’ve lived an exemplary life up until this point of time,” Agostini said. The judge sentenced Sano to two years probation, waiving travel restrictions and probation fees, and ordered him to pay a $5,000 fine. The judge said Sano’s actions could have caused a tremendous tragedy or injury. He felt Sano understood the consequences of his crime. “We all learn from our mistakes,” Agostini said. “However, it’s better to learn from the mistakes of others.”

Sandisfield’s former road boss pays a $50,000 fine to resolve a slew of ethics violations

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/sandisfield-highway-superintendent-ethics/article_d45c6be6-0e93-11ed-9e64-2b27310950fd.html

SANDISFIELD — The town’s former road superintendent agreed to pay a $50,000 fine for a slew of ethical breaches during his tenure. They included using his own construction company to do work for the town more than 90 times. Robert O’Brien admitted to violations of conflict of interest law, according to the State Ethics Commission, which announced the agreement and civil penalty Thursday. With O’Brien’s payment of the civil penalty, the commission dismissed its case against him. After three years as road chief, the town fired O’Brien on Oct. 9, 2018, over allegations at the time that he was using his position for personal gain. This included working private jobs while on the clock for the town, billing the town for asphalt and for allegedly stealing town fuel and falsifying time sheets. The town never pressed criminal charges. Police Chief Michael Morrison told the Select Board at the time he considered the matter criminal, however, and that “stealing is stealing whether it is time or asphalt.”

The Legion Post in Millerton Saturday event

Saturday July 30 The Legion Post in Millerton: Hamburgers, hot dogs, and macaroni salad beginning at 1 PM. Horseshoes and cornhole will be available as will beer and soda.

Celebrate Cornwall Day, Saturday, July 30!

Walk the Trinity Trail (start at the trailhead) from 9-10 led by Barton Jones, Cornwall Conservation Trust President. Trailhead and parking are located past the Retreat Center on Lower River Road. Followed by an Art Show from 10:30 lasting all day of Cornwall Artists at the CCT Office, 7 Railroad Square in West Cornwall. Cornwall Day is back! In celebration of milestones, new beginnings, and all that our growing business community offers, July 30th will be a day for residents and visitors to stop, shop, eat, listen, experience and linger longer in Cornwall. Participating businesses and organizations will offer summer sales, local art, music, family activities, and more.

A selection of activities:

3 Guys Ski & Ride: “Fix it on the fly” bike workshops

Cornwall Conservation Trust: Walk the Trinity Trail, 9-10am led by Barton Jones, followed by an art show of Cornwall Artists at the CCT, 10:30-5pm

Cornwall Co-op Market: Welcome new baker Tamara of Maiden Cakes and enjoy Ridgway Farm’s mid-summer bounty including tomatoes, peaches, green beans and super sweet onions

Cornwall Garden Club: Self-guided Vegetable Garden Stroll from 4-5:30pm with a cool beverage under the Hubbard grape arbor at 5pm

Cornwall Inn: Stop in for a free sample of Mark’s homemade granola from 11-3pm

Cornwall Package Store: Wine tasting

Covered Bridge Electric Bikes: Free one hour bike rentals

Ian Ingersoll: Open house from 4-6pm with refreshments and artwork from Don Bracken and Swede Ahrstrom

Iron Bank: Lemonade and lawn games

Jane Herald Pottery: 10% off select items

Northeast Building Supply: Tent sale

Sally Van Doren Studio: Artist talk

Suzie’s Bakery: Come try their new savory focaccia and milk chocolate cookies

The Local/The Union: Art sale in the with artists on-hand to talk about their work

The Wish House: 25 year anniversary Sale / sample the dumplings of Vicky Zhang / Emily Waters Artist Reception 3-6 pm / music by the Ballyhack School Boys 3:30-5:30 pm

West Cornwall Farmers Market: Clover Hill Alpacas offering spinning, knitting, and needle felting demonstrations / 10-11 am book celebration of The Memory of All That a Love Story about Alzheimer’s by best selling author Mary MacCracken / meet Leon Bouteiller creator of Coffee Tea Etc. Leon’s Blend

The 15th Annual Traditional New England Clambake
Saturday, July 30th from 2:00pm-8:00pm

$70.00 per person includes steamers, raw bar, lobster, potatoes, corn on the cob, dessert, and one beer or wine. Hamburgers, hot dogs, grilled chicken are available for purchase at the event. Enjoy our Music Circle with George Potts and Friends, rain or shine!
Clambake tickets must be purchased in advance by clicking HERE
PLEASE BE SURE TO BRING YOUR TICKET CONFIRMATION WITH YOU TO THE CLAMBAKE!

The Bushnell-Sage Library

The Bushnell-Sage Library on Main Street in Sheffield will feature an art display entitled “The Painting Sisters” from July 1st to July 31st….you can view this exhibit Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10 am to 5 pm, Thursdays and Fridays until 7 pm with weekend showings Saturdays from 10 am to 2 pm and on Sundays from 2 to 5 pm.

Housatonic Youth Service Bureau As case numbers rise, bureau requests funds

https://tricornernews.com

After facing a surge of cases, the Housatonic Youth Service Bureau (HYSB) has requested additional funds from each of the six towns in the region in order to service the community effectively. The HYSB is a nonprofit organization that offers free mental health services, including in-school counseling, clinical counseling and enrichment programs like social clubs, for children between the ages of 4 and 18. During the hardest days of the pandemic, HYSB was forced to suspend its enrichment programs, as well as resorting to video-call counseling. With the number of cases rising after the pandemic, as well as the amount of care each case needs, the HYSB has requested $60,000 from each of the six towns — $360,000 in total.   

Horn forms PAC to assist state, local candidates 

https://tricornernews.com

State Rep. Maria Horn (D-64) has formed a political action committee to help candidates for state and local offices who share Horn’s ideals and beliefs. MPAC (the M stands for “Maria”) is separate from Horn’s reelection campaign. In her announcement, Horn wrote about her alarm at the recent decisions of “a reactionary Supreme Court.” In a phone interview Sunday, July 24, Horn reiterated that MPAC is for supporting like-minded candidates. Asked if it is unusual for a member of the Legislature to form a PAC, Horn said no. When she rst ran for the General Assembly, she received support from PACs associated with Democratic leadership in the Legislature. “ is is a way to pay it forward,” she said. ere are 309 PACs currently listed with the State Elections Enforcement Commission, many of them “Two or more persons” organizations such as MPAC. Another local example is the 30th District Republican Senatorial Committee.  

Terni’s building sold, new buyers want to ‘make her shine’  

https://tricornernews.com

There’s good news for fans of the sea foam green building stationed smack in the middle of Millerton’s business district that was home to the iconic Terni’s Store for 100 years. The three investors who purchased the Main Street property reportedly plan to keep it mostly intact. At least that’s according to Jonathan Bee of Hunter Bee, the popular antiques shop at 21 Main St., steps from where Terni’s Store had operated at 42 Main St., selling everything from fishing tackle to hunting gear to penny candy to newspapers to wool suits to cozy socks to ice cream sodas once made by a soda jerk right at the marble fountain. One of the new investors to the most recent Millerton Business Alliance (MBA) meeting on Wednesday, July 24. Richard Lamberston of Sharon, Conn., introduced himself to the MBA and shared some of his ideas for the building. The investors Lamberston is a designer with an impressive pedigree; he’s designed for Geoffrey Beene, Gucci and Bergdorf Goodman. He has a home in Sharon, Conn., and currently co-owns the antiques shop Privet House, in New Preston, Conn., with his business partner Suzanne Cassano. The other two investors in 42 Main St. are Jason Jobson and Christophe Pourny. Like their partner, they both have long resumes boasting highprofile clients in the fashion and design industry. Jason Jobson informed the Millerton News via email the three investors are not quite ready to go public with their plans, as “they just acquired the building” and don’t have “news at this time,” he did end his statement with encouraging words for our readers.   

Conservation trust enrolls 375 acres in ‘forever wild’ status

https://tricornernews.com

Cornwall Conservation Trust (CCT) enrolled 375 acres of its forested preserves in the Wildlands Partnership, meaning that the land is now permanently “forever-wild,” allowing nature to flourish with minimal human intervention. The Wildlands Partnership is an initiative of Northeast Wilderness Trust (NEWT) that engages local land trusts across the Northeast in wilderness conservation. CCT added wilderness-level protections through a Northeast Wilderness Trust conservation easement to its 200-acre Greyledge Preserve, 100- acre Nancy Nauts Dobbs Preserve and 75-acre Red Mountain Preserve. The protections permit those properties to evolve through natural processes without intensive human management. The forever-wild protection allows access for the public to enjoy the natural beauty of this land on foot. 

Historic Lakeville guided walk 

https://tricornernews.com

Lakeville was a center of industry and commerce from the 1730s through the 1970s. Historian Lou Bucceri will lead a walk and tell stories about places from Porter Street to the Furnace Neighborhood. Sponsored by the Salisbury Association Historical Society, the event is scheduled for Saturday, July 30, at 10 a.m. The walk will begin at the Lakeville Post Office, last less than one hour, and is less than a half mile in length. The Lakeville Historic District contains a mixture of residential, commercial and industrial buildings along with a small mill pond. Some buildings of note are the Farnham Tavern, Holley-Williams House and the Holley Manufacturing Company mill complex. For more information about the event, call 860-435-4804 or email info@salisburyassociation.org  

Kelsey claims civil rights as ex-con violated

https://tricornernews.com

Former Republican Dutchess County Legislator (District 25) and convicted sex offender Michael Kelsey has filed a combination of complaints and lawsuits against his Parole Officer (PO) Christopher Miller, Supervising PO Sabrina Wyns, the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS), the Poughkeepsie Parole Bureau and Bureau Chief Irma Machado for violating his civil rights. Machado responded to one of the complaints on Wednesday, July 20. As part of that response, he removed a restriction placed by Miller, adding he will look into whether some of the conditions placed by the PO were unreasonable. Kelsey was convicted in 2014 and was released on May 5 of this year after serving six years at the Hudson Correction Facility.

Food pantry seeks volunteers 

The St. Thomas Episcopal Church’s Food of Life/ Comida de Vida Pantry at 40 Leedsville Road in South Amenia needs volunteers. People are needed to help get food to those struggling to make ends meet during these desperate times. St. Thomas grows fresh produce in its own garden, and provides non-perishable food and other essential items from its pantry, to those living in the Harlem Valley and in neighboring Connecticut. For details, go to http://www.stthomasamenia.com/volunteer or email samantha@ stthomasamenia.com

Dutchess Legislative map redrawn; See how your district is expected to change

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/local/2022/07/26/dutchess-legislature-redrawn-map-changes-representation-lines/65383168007/

Residents in the Village of Pawling will be represented in a different legislative district in the next election cycle. So will those in Rhinebeck north of the village and western LaGrange. Pleasant Valley, a town of roughly 10,000 residents, will be split among four representatives. The Dutchess County Independent Reapportionment Committee drew these legislative district lines to go into use with the next election cycle. Dutchess County’s Independent Reapportionment Commission recently submitted its map, rewriting the legislative landscape in the county in accordance with the most recent U.S. Census totals. The full impact of the new map is yet to be determined. While the lines for all 25 legislative districts have been redrawn − some more dramatically than others − the map only goes into effect with the next election, and legislators currently representing one district will have the ability to shift to run in another district if they choose.

An interactive map showing district borders in relation to major roads is available at gis.dutchessny.gov/irc-plan-2022/

While some districts appear largely similar to what they have been for years – the 19th and 25th in northern Dutchess, and the 16th, 17th and 18th in Fishkill and Beacon in particular − large swaths of districts like the 2nd and 13th in central Dutchess have changed.

Will the former Housatonic school become a ‘body arts’ museum? That’s one pitch for the space

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/great-barrington-housatonic-school-berkshire-innovation-center-apartments-housing-crisis/article_8b52af0e-0c37-11ed-88b6-4ba5e79847ff.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — Proposals to revive the building that once housed the Housatonic school in the heart of this village are in. They range from apartments by a Berkshire developer who vows to keep rents affordable for middle-income residents to a hair and makeup museum. There’s also a proposal by the Berkshire Innovation Center for a South County hub, or “BIC South,” that would feature technology labs like a digital design studio. The four proposals come in response to a third try by town officials to find a new use for a historic building, a place packed with nostalgia for residents. These proposals come 16 years after the school district moved students to new schools off Route 7. The building was used for various purposes for a time before it was abandoned. It began a long slide into disrepair that has cost the town many tens of thousands. The Select Board will review the proposals at an coming meeting and arrange for times when people can comment.

Connecticut Small Business Boost Fund opens door for businesses to get loans

Connecticut Small Business Boost Fund opens door for businesses to get loans

Canaan learns of subdivision proposal along river

Canaan learns of subdivision proposal along river

CANAAN — The Planning and Zoning Commission got a preview of a large subdivision that is proposed to be built along the Housatonic River. George Johannesen of Allied Engineering presented the plan at a meeting held on July 11 at Town Hall, showcasing a 51-unit condominium community on a 114-acre parcel owned by Bruce McEver of Honey Hill Development LLC. Access would be from the corner of Honey Hill Road and Route 44. Three houses will front on Honey Hill Road and the remainder will be within the property, with much of the property remaining undisturbed, according to the proposal. Johannesen explained that the plan seeks to take advantage of the conservational development rules listed in the commission’s subdivision regulations “to save the natural resources and avoid cookie-cutter development.” Residents will own their homes, but a homeowners’ association will own the property on which they sit and maintain it. The owner hopes to gain access to the Canaan Fire District’s sewage plant and install pump chambers throughout the area. But if not possible, individual or communal septic systems will be considered.

Amenia Lions recognize citizen of the year and their own achievements..

On Wednesday, July 20th, Lion President, Jessica Moore, presided over the annual installation dinner recognizing the Club’s Citizen of the Year, Sue Patel, for her outstanding dedication and service to the Community in the Amenia Post Office for 40 years. In attendance was her husband, Bharat, who was also an Amenia Lion years ago, and their two sons. In addition, Lions members Ann Sartori and Becky Duncan received special appreciation for going above and beyond with various projects. Eric Eschbach was named Lion of the Year and the Amenia Lions Citizenship Scholarship was renamed in honor of Ken and Lori Hale for their tremendous dedication to the community and Club as they begin their retirement from Maplebrook School (but not the Lions Club-not yet anyways). Past District Governor, Wilfred Roehe (55 years in Lionism) then inducted new member, Andres Valdespino and installed the officers for 2022-23.

In spite of the Covid, the Amenia Lions have continued undaunted and demonstrated its motto of “WE SERVE” by raising and investing more than $18, 000 back into the community this past year for various causes and needs!!

Congressional Award silver medalists announced

Kayla O’Marra of Bethel & Mehar Bhasin of Lakeville, are Congressional Award silver medalists announced by Jahana Hayes. The Congressional Award is the highest honor a Member of the House can bestow upon a youth civilian.

Green bus delivers books in Sharon Ex-teacher helps keep kids reading

Green bus delivers books in Sharon Ex-teacher helps keep kids reading

SHARON – Heather Mathews tootles around town in her little green bus, sharing her love of books. The Sharon Center School teacher, who works as a remedial reading teacher for grades kindergarten through fourth, grins as she watches people gather around the vehicle to take advantage of her offerings. After a long search for the proper bus, she found one in May in Portland, Maine. She chuckled showing the sign on the rear bumper that tells it was last used at a brewery. In very good shape, the bus needed little to make it workable for her purposes, but she has several plans for adapting it further in the future. She pointed out where shelves, a comfort chair and other amenities eventually will be. Mathews, who has been a teacher for 31 years, works hard to combat the effects of the “summer slide,” when children lose ground in their academics during the long vacation. That now has been coupled for many with what she calls the “COVID slide.” She spoke about the struggling and reluctant readers who make great strides during the year, only to lose that drive and stamina during the summer hiatus. She said statistics show second-graders start the new year where they were at in April of first grade. Sharon Center School also has a rate of 44% students receiving free or reduced lunch, so books may not be a priority purchase in some homes. She operates a tutoring service, H & H Educator, named for her and her dog, Holly, a certified therapy dog. She uses the money earned from that business for her expenses. But she is overwhelmed by the support she’s received. In addition to books, donors have offered her money to pay for gas for her 2003 Ford diesel bus, which had 130,000 miles on when she purchased it.

The 34th Falcon Ridge Folk Festival will make its annual flight once again, a full 3 days this year

The 34th Falcon Ridge Folk Festival will make its annual flight once again, a full 3 days this year, pandemic precautions still in place & both in-person and livestream options on Fri/Sat/Sun July 29, 30 & 31 at the Goshen Fairgrounds in Goshen CT. Marking a week earlier calendar spot and customary Brigadoon-like appearance, the fest resumes it’s 3 day format with early camping opening on Weds July 28, no dance tent coming back just yet but still brimming with love, talent, community spirit and of course, still accessible and ASL-interpreted. The joyous return will feature 24 performers on 3 stages, wonderful food & crafts as always, Activities 4 Kids and a brand-new community sing program. Though current pandemic precautions as well as the fest organizers own proceed-with-an-abundance-of-caution attitude will place some limits on what is offered it will not dampen the community vibe always shared at Falcon Ridge. Fest stalwarts, the Slambovian Circus of Dreams, Nerissa & Katryna Nields, Dan Navarro, Dar Williams & Mary Gauthier are all on board the hybrid fest train along with folk icon & founder of the Greenwich Village Folk Festival Rod MacDonald. Singer/Songwriter, Crys Matthews whose song CHANGEMAKERS garnered SONG OF THE YEAR honors in 2021 from FOLK ALLIANCE INTERNATIONAL along with indigenous Canadian blueswoman Crystal Shawanda, recipient of the 2021 JUNO award for Blues Album of the Year are on board as is the 2015 winner of THE VOICE, Sawyer Fredericks, the youngest male winner of the competition now hoeing his own musical row and bluegrass/banjo pioneer Tony Trischka plus many others. Music begins daily at 10AM and ends by 10PM.

For those who cannot attend in person, a livestream will be available. More info on this can be found at FalconRidgeFolk.com or by calling 860 364-0366.

Amenia Needs Homes informal discussion

10am to noon Saturday July 30th at Amenia Town Hall Gym. This is to provide information on what the Amenia Housing Board has been doing, where we are in the development process, and how you can help make housing for working people and seniors a reality in our town. There will be coffee and cinnamon buns, and an opportunity to have your voice heard on this subject.

ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON, N.Y.—Dr. Felicia Keesing, Bard College’s David and Rosalie Rose Distinguished Professor of Science, Mathematics, and Computing, has been selected as the winner of the 2022 International Cosmos Prize by the Expo ’90 Foundation.

Dr. Keesing will receive a certificate of merit, a medallion, and a monetary prize of 40 million yen (approximately $290,000 USD) at the award ceremony, which will be held in Osaka, Japan on November 9. Dr. Keesing will also give a commemorative lecture, participate in a symposium held in her honor, and have an audience with the Emperor and Empress of Japan. The International Cosmos Prize Committee states: “Dr. Felicia Keesing clarified the relationship between biodiversity and the risk of zoonotic pathogen transmission by conducting practical research and studies. She has demonstrated that while ecosystems with high biodiversity can be a breeding ground of various pathogens, the overall infection risk can be reduced in these ecosystems due to the presence of a dilution effect, thereby proving that biodiversity is of critical value to human society. These research achievements are instrumental in exploring the interrelationships among all life forms and provide sensible suggestions for seeking the ideal state of ‘Harmonious Coexistence between Nature and Humankind’ in the post-COVID-19 era.” Read the Committee’s Reasons for Awarding the Prize to Dr. Keesing here. “I am honored to receive the International Cosmos Prize for 2022. The purpose of this prize and the activities of the Expo ’90 Foundation focus on the harmonious coexistence of humanity and the natural world. I can imagine no more important topic,” said Dr. Keesing. “Working closely with undergraduate students has been an ongoing source of inspiration. Perhaps most importantly, as I watch my students, and my children, grapple with the realities of the world they are inheriting, I am acutely aware of the stakes of the choices we are making.” Read Dr. Keesing’s full comments on winning the award here. The annual Cosmos Prize is awarded in recognition of a body of work that has significantly advanced our understanding of the relationships among living organisms and the interdependence of life and the global environment. The decision to award the prize to Dr. Keesing was reached after the committee evaluated 174 nominations from 28 countries. Previous recipients include Jared Diamond (1998), David Attenborough (2000), E.O. Wilson (2012), and Jane Goodall (2017).

State proposes cuts in parking space near town’s crosswalks  

https://tricornernews.com

NORTH CANAAN — Reacting to an email from state officials proposing to reduce the number of parking spaces on either side of crosswalks, the Board of Selectmen decided to request a meeting to review those plans that would affect the town center along Routes 7 and 44. The plan to reduce parking was discussed at the regular meeting of the Board of Selectmen on Tuesday, July 12. Under the plan’s provisions, 20 linear feet along the curb would be designated as “No Parking” on either side of a crosswalk. One area of particular concern to the selectmen is along the curb in front of Roma’s Pizza. First Selectman Charles Perotti and Selectman Christian Allyn plan to meet with state officials to learn more about the plan and discuss the details.

Wanda Houston at Noble July 22 

Wanda Houston will offer an outdoor performance with her band, HBH, on Friday, July 22, 7 p.m. at Noble Horizons. Known for her soaring vocals and dazzling renditions of musical theater, jazz, gospel and R&B, Houston will be joined by members of her HBH Band, percussionist Jay Bradley and keyboardist Scott Heth. Guests are welcome to bring their own chairs and blankets or request a table reservation. Please RSVP at http://www.noblehorizons.org or call 860-435-9851. 

Musicians Tag Sale

‘The Musicians Tag Sale in North Canaan this Saturday has been postponed until Saturday August 20th. Call The music Lab @ 860 671 7996 for info’.

North East secures Millerton police services

https://tricornernews.com

The town of North East has contracted with the village for police services. It signed a one-year contract on Thursday, July 14, for the Millerton Police Department (MPD) to continue protecting North East residents. The decision followed a year of much public debate whether the MPD should exist at all. The Village Board has not yet signed the contract, but plans to do so at its meeting on Monday, July 25, according to Village Clerk and Treasurer Kelly Kilmer. Kilmer said she and Millerton Mayor Jenn Najdek “will get the authority from the board through a motion to sign the contract Monday night.” The village is now on its second version of a local law to possibly abolish the MPD. If it does, the Dutchess County Sheriff’s Office (DCSO) would be hired to protect Millerton. Acting Dutchess County Sheriff Kirk Imperati attended a special workshop in March to discuss how it would serve the village if hired to replace the MPD. The Village Board has been struggling with that decision for the past year, which is why on July 5 the Village Board “sent out a Request for Proposals [RFP] for an independent third party assessment of police services needs,” said Najdek. “What we have, what we should have, what the benefits are, what the negatives are, what the pros and cons of both are.” The board wants to assess “other municipalities in our area and other services in our area and how that relates to us,” she explained.

The RFP deadline is Friday, July 29, at 4 p.m.

“Comments have been made that this is personal, whatever,” added the mayor. “This is the way to now see how a professional consultant who comes in says what is best to do, somebody who has done this before for other municipalities. There is a reason there are so few villages with their own police departments.” North East town Supervisor Chris Kennan said he was glad the contract was signed, despite its controversy.

Canaan Child Care Center

The Canaan Child Care Center is participating in Northwest Corner Gives! Raising funds to outfit a second classroom to accommodate additional children into our accredited, School Readiness site. All gifts will be matched by NW Corner Gives up to $7,150. Your support is greatly appreciated!

https://northwestcornergives.org/donation…/donations/cccc/

The Congregational Church of Salisbury, UCC, is delighted to welcome David Baranowski as its Music Director. He succeeds Dr. Samuel Lord Kalcheim, who has been the Transitional Music Director for two years and is departing to focus on his passions for composing and teaching.

In addition to guiding the church’s music programs, leading the choir, and providing music in worship services, David will continue the tradition of offering “Meeting House Music and Meditations,” on the first Friday of every month from 12-12:30pm. Baranowski has played and directed numerous chamber and choral concerts in New York and Connecticut, conducted “Così fan tutte” for Delaware Valley Opera, and musical directed and conducted “The Wild Party” and “Crazy for You” for the Musical Theater department at Western Connecticut State University. Prior to assuming leadership of the music ministry at Salisbury UCC, David was the Director of Music at St. Jude Roman Catholic Church in Monroe, CT. In 2020 he was named Artistic Director of the Hudson Chorale, after serving as Assistant Director and Accompanist for 10 years. Through the worst of the pandemic, he rallied the group to rehearse and perform two concerts using an open-source online audio platform, acting as engineer, editor, and sound mixer, in addition to his musical leadership. He also serves as Music Director for the Westchester Choral Society, and as a music professor at Western CT State University, teaching music theory, ear training, and piano. For the past eighteen years, David has been touring internationally with rock icon Ritchie Blackmore, as both keyboardist and singer. He has played over 100 concerts and visited nearly 25 countries as a member of Blackmore’s Night, which has been on the charts in Germany, Czech Republic, Russia, England, and the United States. He has also appeared on German television multiple times, and was featured on the primetime programs Hit Giganten and Fernsehgarten, reaching millions of viewers. He appears on several concert DVDs that have earned Double Gold status in Germany and other European countries. David has collaborated with Irish pop singer and composer, Julie Feeney, and in the spring of 2012 he played keyboard for Ms. Feeney’s 10 performances at the Irish Arts Center in Manhattan, which earned rave reviews in The New York Times. He studied piano with Paul Ostrovsky and Steven Lubin, organ with Robert Fertitta, and voice with Stefano Algieri. He received both his Bachelor and Master of Music degrees from Purchase College Conservatory of Music. David lives in Danbury with his wife Jennifer and their son Vincent.

Bard Professor Peter L’Official Wins Rabkin Prize for Visual Art Journalism

ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON, N.Y.—Peter L’Official, associate professor of literature and director of the American Studies Program at Bard College, has won a Rabkin Prize of $50,000 for his work in visual art journalism. L’Official is one of eight visual art journalists to receive a Rabkin Prize from the Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation. Jurors for this sixth cycle of awards were: Eric Gibson (Arts in Review editor of the Wall Street Journal), Sasha Anawalt (Professor Emerita of Journalism at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism), and Paul Schmelzer (Founder of The Ostracon: Dispatches from Beyond Contemporary Art’s Center).

2022 Annual Housatonic Heritage Walks Announced

5 Weekends of Free, Guided Tours

The Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area announces the 20th annual autumn “Housatonic Heritage Walks” on five weekends: September 3 & 4, 10 & 11, 17 & 18, 24 & 25 and Oct. 1 & 2.   80+ free, guided walks will be offered throughout Berkshire County, MA, and Litchfield County, CT. The public is invited to participate in these family-friendly, informative walks, offered in partnership with our region’s historic, cultural, outdoor recreation organizations. The Heritage Walks are the ideal opportunity to experience and learn about our region’s rich and varied local heritage. Historians, naturalists, and environmentalists will lead participants on explorations through historic estate gardens and town districts, behind-the-scenes cultural site tours, nature walks, trail hikes, and tours of many of the industrial-site ruins that were once thriving local industries.  There will be Native-American and African American history walks, a canoe paddling trip on the Housatonic River & a bike tour on scenic country roads. Detailed Heritage Walks brochures will be available at libraries, post offices, restaurants and grocery stores in the region.  The Walks schedule is also available online at: https://housatonicheritage.org/events/heritage-walks/

To request a brochure by mail, email  programs@housatonicheritage.org

2022 Heritage Walk participants will be subject to federal & state guidelines for safe conduct during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Salisbury Artisans Group

The Salisbury Artisans Summer Market is July 23rd, 10 am- 4 pm on the White Hart Lawn. We are excited to have over 15 vendors participating this Saturday. We hope you can set aside some time to stop by and shop all of the local artisans! The event is RAIN or SHINE (but as of now, the weather looks good).

Town meetings

Salisbury Affordable Housing Commission
Thu, July 21, 5:30pm – 6:30pm

Cornwall Conservation Commission Meeting – Zoom
July 21 @ 10:30 am EDT
Board of Finance Meeting – Zoom
July 21 @ 7:00 pm EDT

Cornwall Rummage Sale

July 23 @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm EDT
Cornwall Rummage Sale
Saturday, July 23: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sunday, July 24: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Monday, July 25: Fill a Bag and Bargain Day 9 a.m. – noon

Sheffield Historical Society

The Sheffield historical society on Main Street welcomes the public to a free bird themed open house on Saturday, July 23rd from 11 am to 2 pm. Ken Schop will host a discussion on South County birds, the Sharon Audubon birds of prey and a tour of their historical buildings. A craft fair, snacks and drinks will also be available.

Village Of Millerton

Proposed Local Law “C” of 2022
A Public Hearing regarding this proposed law will be held on July 25, 2022 @ 6PM at the Village Hall located at 5933 N. Elm Avenue.

Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax return to April Hill for a benefit concert for Greenagers on Sunday, July 24,

Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax return to April Hill for a benefit concert for Greenagers on Sunday, July 24, at 6 PM under a tent on April Hill’s grounds come rain or shine. For more information and to purchase your tickets go here: https://greenagers.org/tickets/. All proceeds support Greenagers programs for youth environmental stewardship.

Will the traditional ‘1812 Overture’ conclude Tanglewood on Parade this summer?

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/opinion/columnists/clarence-fanto-the-bottom-line-1812-overture-tanglewood-on-parade-ukrainian-war/article_7a96cfe0-0851-11ed-a347-9be6354fe772.html

LENOX — What would Tanglewood on Parade be without the audience-favorite show-closer, Tchaikovsky’s triumphal, cranked-up “1812 Overture,” complete with live or pre-recorded cannons and a post-performance fireworks show? This summer, as Russia’s brutal invasion of Ukraine enters its sixth month, the Boston Symphony Orchestra management debated whether to include it at the annual July 4 Boston Pops gala on the Esplanade and then at Tanglewood on Parade on Aug. 2. The piece celebrates the defeat and retreat of Napoleon’s invading French army from Russia in the winter of 1812. It wasn’t an easy call, because the fiery showpiece is a mélange of Russian hymns, folk songs and patriotic tunes such as “God Save the Tsar,” ending with the Russian anthem overwhelming France’s “La Marseillaise,” augmented by church bells and cannons. Improbably, it has been adopted by American audiences as an Independence Day expression of American patriotism. After much discussion, Boston Pops conductor Keith Lockhart, in his 27th season as successor to John Williams, offered a solution — as he told The Eagle in a recent interview, the idea was to first play the Ukrainian national anthem, followed by Tchaikovsky’s paean to the indomitable Russian spirit. At the Esplanade, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus did the honors. An orchestral arrangement of the anthem conducted by Thomas Wilkins will be performed ahead of the “1812” at the 8 p.m. Tanglewood on Parade gala concert on Aug. 2; Tchaikovsky’s piece will be led by Stefan Asbury, head of the conducting program at the Tanglewood Music Center. Confirming the plan for anthem-plus-overture, the BSO management stated that “both are dedicated to the people of Ukraine and the courage and perseverance they have consistently shown in their struggle for their country’s continuing independence.”

Jill Biden to visit Connecticut Wednesday

Jill Biden to visit state Wednesday

Jill Biden and Education Secretary Miguel Cardona will visit Connecticut Wednesday to examine summer learning programs that are helping children who fell behind during the pandemic catch up on reading, writing and arithmetic before the new school year begins. The stop is part of a two-day tour that will also include Michigan and Georgia, which gives the first lady and Cardona a chance to highlight programs that are paid for by President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief program. The $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan set aside $122 billion to help schools safely reopen and stay open during the pandemic, and address students’ academic and mental health needs. Biden, a professor at Northern Virginia Community College, and Cardona, were opening the tour Wednesday by visiting a Horizons National summer learning program held at the private Albertus Magnus College in New Haven, for local public elementary school students.

Source of ‘loud blast’ that rattled Sheffield residents remains a mystery

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/sheffield-massachusetts-berkshires-explosion/article_77f3fa98-0783-11ed-968b-ebfeeec5bdb9.html

SHEFFIELD — A number of residents Monday afternoon reported hearing and feeling what they believed was an explosion. But a search by police and fire officials in the area found no evidence of a blast. “When I got there, there were people outside their houses trying to figure out what it was,” said Sheffield Police Chief Eric Munson III. “It shook and vibrated through the air but there were no broken windows.” Munson said that at least 10 people in and around the area of Alum Hill Road “heard it and felt it,” but the origin of the sound is still a mystery. No one had called in any reports of fire, injuries or damage. Munson and Sheffield Fire Chief David Ullrich said that the calls came in around 3:45 p.m. Firefighters from several departments and police headed toward the area. “It ended up being nothing,” Ullrich said, noting the “loud blast” also did not appear to be a blown electrical transformer. “We couldn’t find the source.”

A lifeline for those in crisis is now three digits away. What happens when you call 988 from Berkshire County?

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/local/988-emergency-call-berkshire-county/article_ae1cbee6-077b-11ed-b3bf-7b3a47199425.html

As the nation’s suicide prevention and mental health hotlines change, Berkshire County mental health providers are adjusting to the shift. The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline launched Saturday, signaling a new option for people experiencing mental health crises that would not require a police or fire response. The lifeline, which is available via call or text by entering 988, connects people with call centers, where staff offer immediate help and connect those in distress with services in their area. The lifeline will effectively replace the National Suicide Hotline, 800-273-8255 (TALK), although that number will remain active. The transition is meant to be easier to remember for users. The switch to the 988 number is expected to increase call volumes considerably. A press release from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration said that the number of callers and texters to the service is expected to at least double from its 2021 total of about 3.6 million after the transition to the 988 Lifeline.

Sunday marked five years since Southington resident Michael Gagnon died at age 22 from an opioid overdose.

Gagnon is one of hundreds of thousands who have died from opioid addiction in the United States over the last few decades, and his mother Christine Gagnon is a staunch advocate in finding ways to end the opioid epidemic. During a Monday press conference made her stance clear that a bulk of Connecticut’s first $11 million payment from a landmark $26 billion opioid settlement against the country’s top pharmaceutical companies should be invested in educating students on the dangers of drugs. The $11 million payment is the first Connecticut will receive over 18 years for a total of $300 million, the largest funding award possible after all 169 state municipalities signed up for the settlement, officials said. Funds will go toward expanding access to prevention, intervention, treatment and recovery programs. The settlement came out of lawsuits alleging that the nation’s top pharmaceutical companies – Johnson & Johnson, AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson – generated massive profits from exaggerating the benefits of opioid medications to hide their dangers.

Residents, officials share concerns, input on affordable housing project

Residents, officials share concerns, input on affordable housing project

SALISBURY — Concerns about a proposal to allow the Salisbury Housing Committee right-of-way access over a 150-foot strip of land to pave the way for the East Railroad Street affordable housing project were interspersed with supportive applause for the plan during an informational meeting Saturday morning. A town meeting to vote on the request is scheduled for Thursday, July 28, at 7:30 p.m. at the Salisbury Congregational Church. Seventy residents attended the session, held at the meeting room of the church, to hear the details and offer their comments and questions. A site visit to the property, which extends past Fowler Street on East Railroad Street in the center of town, was held prior to the meeting. Former Selectman Jim Dresser has donated the five-acre parcel on which 18 to 20 units are planned. The strip of land being sought parallels the town-owned Rail Trail and is needed for access to install a driveway to the site. Peter Halle, chairman of the committee, started off the meeting by stating the group agrees with a suggestion that an advisory group of neighbors be formed to provide input on the project. Jocelyn Ayer, a committee member and housing advocate, gave an overview of the need for affordable housing in the town, pointing out that staffing of businesses and schools, as well as emergency organizations, has become difficult. The site being considered, said Ayer, could accommodate 44 units, but the committee is proposing 18 to 20. Abeth Slotnick, an architect who serves on the committee, explained a thorough traffic study will be done as part of the process. Eventually, the application will go through deep scrutiny by the Planning and Zoning Commission and Inland Wetlands. The site is walkable to town businesses and a buffer zone between the Rail Trail and the driveway is planned, she said. Funding for the project is expected to come from the state, but it cannot be applied for until access is secured. During the comment period, Sean Grace, whose house is nearby the proposed construction area, said the prospect of 20 or more cars going in and out will change the nature of the area. “You’re trying to solve all the problems on a few acres,” Grace said. “It’s going to become an issue of us and them.” He and others brought up the fact that Faith House, which is another of the committee’s projects, has not been well maintained. Amy Longley said she is concerned that once the buildings are up, the state doesn’t have money to maintain them. Ayer assured her there is funding for maintenance. Longley, who lives in the neighborhood, said she will be impacted by the additional traffic on the road. “Cluster housing in the center of town is not a good idea,” she said. When one woman brought up the threat of possible increased drug use due to the housing, Ayer said the topic for the day was only the access issue. Some others said they are concerned that the number of units could significantly increase over time.

New York COVID cases surge 21% as officials renew push to improve vaccine, booster rates

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/07/18/new-york-covid-weekly-numbers-unvaccinated-unboosted-hit-hardest/65375663007/

New York’s weekly tally of COVID-19 cases leaped 21% last week while the omicron BA.5 subvariant wave disproportionately impacted those refusing to get vaccinated and boosted against the illness. New York reported 52,949 new COVID-19 cases in the week ending Sunday, up from 43,641 cases the prior week. New York ranked 16th among the states where coronavirus was spreading the fastest on a per-person basis, a USA TODAY Network analysis of Johns Hopkins University data shows. Nationally, COVID-19 cases increased 29% from the week before, with 947,862 cases reported. Across the country, 42 states had more cases in the latest week than they did in the week before. The rise of the highly contagious BA.5 subvariant in New York and across the country in recent weeks prompted federal officials on Friday to urge eligible Americans to stay up-to-date with their COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, citing upticks in hospitalizations and deaths. Those 50 and older who were fully vaccinated and had just one booster shot were four times more likely to die from COVID-19 than those who had the recommended two boosters, officials said.

Mass. Senate unveils a ‘huge’ $4.3 billion economic development

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/statehouse/massachusetts-senate-unveils-huge-43-billion-economic-development-bill/article_ff1d3f9a-06eb-11ed-8d78-f79c26867f36.html

BOSTON — Senators will vote Thursday on a $4.3 billion economic development bill that would more than double the House-approved investment in human service provider rates and affordable housing construction, and take a different route to long-awaited tax reforms. Top Senate Democrats on Monday outlined the contours of the bill that will hit the chamber floor later in the week. It combines bonding, federal relief funds and surplus state budget dollars in a single spending package that also features permanent tax changes. The bill is taking shape only eight months after Gov. Charlie Baker signed another $4 billion law allocating federal American Rescue Plan Act funds and fiscal 2021 state budget surplus revenues. The legislation would spread investments out across the state, focusing in particular on health and human services (in line for $962.5 million in appropriations), environment and climate initiatives ($610 million) and housing ($400 million). Several areas of spending differ from the $4.2 billion version that cleared the House unanimously last week. The Senate bill would bump up Chapter 257 human service provider rate funding to $250 million, or $150 million more than the House bill, and push money available for housing production from $175 million to $400 million. Other Senate-only measures include $150 million in Commonwealth Cares for Children, or C3, grants for early education providers, building on $250 million in the fiscal year 2023 budget; $100 million for electric vehicle rollout and charging infrastructure; and tripling the cap on Housing Development Incentives Program credits to $30 million to encourage development in Gateway Cities. The bill calls for nearly $1.39 billion in bond authorizations and about $2.9 billion in direct spending from either state government’s pot of remaining American Rescue Plan Act funds or a fiscal year 2022 budget surplus. Senate Ways and Means Committee Chairman Michael Rodrigues said the non-bond dollars would be “split mostly evenly” between ARPA and the surplus, though a committee spokesperson later clarified that the legislation does not set a limit on how much the administration could draw from either source to execute the spending outlined.

Books In Sharon This Week

Heather Morren Mathews has “new’ books ready for another busy week. She will be at the town concert Wednesday night and Little Rascals on Thursday from 12:30-1:30. Last week was a HUGE success! #KeepSharonReading

Community Solar for Amenia

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has given Amenia the green light to launch a Community Solar Campaign. The initiative is designed to help Amenia residents who get an electric bill from NYSEG save an average 10% on their monthly electric bill. If you pay a NYSEG bill, you’re eligible to receive part of your electricity from a clean, renewable resource and save money in the process. There is no cost to subscribe or cancel and no solar panels to install. You can keep your ESCO if you have one. Once 10 residents sign up, Amenia will be on its way to qualify for a $5,000 grant from the NYS Department of Energy Conservation. This grant can be used to support future climate smart projects that Amenia can pursue. We hope more than 10 residents will take advantage of this opportunity. Spots fill quickly. For more information on Community Solar, how it works and to sign up, see: Community Solar for Your Home – NYSERDA

Please contact Stacy Mantel at smantel@ameniany.gov to assist with this process. Help Amenia qualify for the grant by letting us know once you’ve successfully signed up for a community solar program. One company is offering a gift card as an incentive. Another is offering a $75 sign up bonus.

Ancram Town Pool

The Ancram Town Pool will be closed July 19th and July 23rd due to the unavailability of lifeguards.

Several Berkshires projects win state grants to contend with our changing climate

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/local/state-grants-to-address-flooding-issues/article_38974994-047d-11ed-a381-4b68e573c604.html

Several projects in the Berkshires to handle heavier rains brought on by the changing climate will advance with new backing from the state. The $4.6 million in overall grant funding for 31 projects statewide, announced this week, includes $367,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funding to pay for construction work on a culvert replacement project along the Savery Brook at Frost Road in Washington. The culvert there is too small and collapsed. The finished structure will increase stream connectivity, improve aquatic habitat, and reduce flooding hazards. Another grant of $26,500 will go to Egremont to conduct engineering, design, and permitting work on a culvert replacement project along a tributary to Karner Brook at Blunt Road. Replacing the degraded structure will improve stream connectivity and decrease barriers to wildlife passage. In the town of Mount Washington, the Nature Conservancy will get $50,000 in American Rescue Plan Act money to remove the Becker Pond Dam. Taking it out, the state says, will both eliminate a public safety hazard and the liability the dam’s owner faces. It will also restore the pond’s ecology, including fish passage. The money will go to cover final designs on the dam’s removal, along with permitting and bid services. Also receiving a grant is the Housatonic Valley Association’s Berkshire Clean, Cold, Connected Restoration Partnership. The $220,375 grant will fund ecological restoration, such as road-stream crossing replacements.

Salisbury senior housing complex celebrates 50 years

Salisbury senior housing complex celebrates 50 years

Black skies and torrential rains didn’t let those attending Tuesday’s community picnic mar a festive occasion. The skies soon cleared and the celebration to mark the 50th anniversary of Noble Horizons joyfully continued. Located near the center of Salisbury, the campus was designed as a housing complex for persons 65 and older. According to its historical records, it was made possible through the bequest of the late Ethel Noble of Sharon and New York City. Noble’s vision was to offer housing within the reach of retired, middle-income people so “that they might live out their lives in comfort and dignity.” The interest from her $8.5 million bequest was used to construct the initial 20 cottages, and in honor of the Nobles and their Sharon estate called Blue Horizons, the campus was named Noble Horizons. She worked with her attorney Tom Wagner and his wife, Fran, who shared her vision to make it a reality. Located on 110 acres in a bucolic setting, the facility now has 50 cottages for independent living and several wings in two buildings offering various levels of care. As guests dined on a chicken barbecue with all the fixings and listened to the upbeat music of the Salisbury Band, Executive Director William Pond gave a message. He thanked the myriad people who made the event possible, including anniversary planning committee members Mary Barton, Susan Gallaway, Judy McKernon and Trish Walsh.

Kent weighs hiring second trooper, work as school resource officer

Kent weighs hiring second trooper, work as school resource officer

KENT — The selectmen were unanimous Wednesday in their support of the Board of Education’s request to add a second state police trooper to serve the town and be a school resource officer. Selectman Glenn Sanchez noted that the Main Street Traffic and Noise Subcommittee that he serves on has discussed the need for a second trooper, particularly on the weekends. First Selectman Jean Speck said she agrees that it will serve the town well. The town is currently served by a resident trooper, Andrew Fisher, who has been in the town’s post since 2013. Kent has contracted with the state for a trooper for decades but removed the expense in 2009, after unhappiness with the trooper on duty with the town. Selectman Rufus P. de Rham said that he has a lot of questions about the idea. He asked about the hours needed during the day and asked whether there would really be enough for a trooper to do in the school eight hours a day for five days a week.

New York bans smoking in public parks and beaches.

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/07/15/ny-bans-smoking-in-public-parks-beaches-what-to-know/65374582007/

A new statewide ban on smoking in public parks and beaches in New York carries a $50 fine for those caught lighting up outside of designated smoking areas, such as parking lots. Gov. Kathy Hochul on Friday signed the state law prohibiting smoking in municipal or state-operated beaches, pools, boardwalks, marinas, playgrounds, recreation centers, public parks and group camps. The law exempts the Adirondacks and Catskills from the smoking ban as well as parking lots, sidewalks adjoining parks, and areas not used for park purposes. “Smoking is a dangerous habit that affects not only the smoker but everyone around them, including families and children enjoying our state’s great public places,” Hochul said in a statement.

Several Berkshires projects win state grants to contend with our changing climate

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/local/state-grants-to-address-flooding-issues/article_38974994-047d-11ed-a381-4b68e573c604.html

Several projects in the Berkshires to handle heavier rains brought on by the changing climate will advance with new backing from the state. The $4.6 million in overall grant funding for 31 projects statewide, announced this week, includes $367,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funding to pay for construction work on a culvert replacement project along the Savery Brook at Frost Road in Washington. The culvert there is too small and collapsed. The finished structure will increase stream connectivity, improve aquatic habitat, and reduce flooding hazards. Another grant of $26,500 will go to Egremont to conduct engineering, design, and permitting work on a culvert replacement project along a tributary to Karner Brook at Blunt Road. Replacing the degraded structure will improve stream connectivity and decrease barriers to wildlife passage. In the town of Mount Washington, the Nature Conservancy will get $50,000 in American Rescue Plan Act money to remove the Becker Pond Dam. Taking it out, the state says, will both eliminate a public safety hazard and the liability the dam’s owner faces. It will also restore the pond’s ecology, including fish passage. The money will go to cover final designs on the dam’s removal, along with permitting and bid services. Also receiving a grant is the Housatonic Valley Association’s Berkshire Clean, Cold, Connected Restoration Partnership. The $220,375 grant will fund ecological restoration, such as road-stream crossing replacements.

Over a dozen applicants to grow cannabis in state under review

Over a dozen applicants to grow cannabis in state under review

The state Department of Consumer Protection is now reviewing 16 applications for social equity cultivators licenses that the Social Equity Council recommended for approval earlier this week. This process is expected to take several weeks. The landmark 2021 law legalizing recreational cannabis reserves half of all cannabis business licenses for people from communities most negatively affected by cannabis prohibition to promote social equity. The 15-member Social Equity Council recommends applicants for these preferred licenses. The law defines these so-called “Disproportionately Impacted Areas” as census tracts with high rates of drug-related convictions or high unemployment rate. State officials have identified more than 200 census tracts that meet either criteria, including 28 in Waterbury, 11 in Torrington, five each in Southbury, Naugatuck and Cheshire, and three each in Oxford, Plymouth and Litchfield. A social equity applicant is a person or partners who have at least 65% ownership in a cannabis establishment. They must also meet residency and income requirements. Based on recommendations by the consultant firm CohnReznick, the Social Equity Council voted Tuesday to recommend the first round of 16 applicants for social equity cultivator licenses. The panel voted to deny 25 others. Cannabis cultivators will be licensed to grow and produce cannabis and sell their products to other businesses rather than directly to consumers. The licensing fee is $3 million.

Dry conditions: Stage 2 drought in all Connecticut counties

Dry conditions: Stage 2 drought in all Connecticut counties

Gov. Ned Lamont declared Thursday that all eight counties in Connecticut are experiencing drought conditions and urged residents to voluntarily take steps to reduce their water consumption. The Democrat’s declaration was based on a recommendation by the state’s Interagency Drought Workgroup, which determined that every county in the state is experiencing Stage 2 drought conditions due to below normal precipitation. Stage 2 is the second of five drought stages defined by the Connecticut Drought Response and Preparedness Plan. On June 2, the workgroup classified New London and Windham counties as being at Stage 1, essentially a “heads up” about the early signs of abnormally dry conditions.

Should $4.5B power project receive a Dutchess tax break? Company plans to resubmit request

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/local/2022/07/14/champlain-hudson-power-express-project-pursuing-dutchess-tax-break/65371736007/

The developer of a $4.5 billion project that would transport renewable energy from Canada to New York City through high voltage cables withdrew a proposal for a tax break with the Dutchess County Industrial Development Agency amid an outcry from local groups and officials. However, Transmission Developers Inc., which withdrew its request for a tax exemptions approaching $120 million over 30 years on the eve of Wednesday’s IDA meeting, plans to present the application in a future meeting, after it became clear that there were topics that needed additional discussion with local stakeholders. According to the application, the organization states the Champlain Hudson Power Express would need such an exemption to proceed. The project would run hydro power down from Canada along 339 miles of transmission cables, both underwater and underground. The cables would enter the Hudson River just north of the Dutchess County border and continue south into New York City, with the exception of a small stretch of line above ground in Rockland County.

From the Home Front to the Front Lines: 

The Roeliff Jansen Historical Society Remembers WWII  

Saturday, July 16th 2 to 4 PM.

The exhibit will be open each Saturday & Sunday from 2 to 4 PM through September, 2022.

This summer, visit the Roeliff Jansen Historical Society Museum to experience World War II from the personal perspective of those who served at home and overseas — these remarkable stories are told through a vast assemblage of mementos, artifacts, correspondence, photographs on loan from residents of the Roe Jan area and beyond! 

Strong storms cause outages, trees down

Strong storms cause outages, trees down

NORFOLK — Strong storms that struck the Northwest Corner Tuesday afternoon took down power lines and blocked roads with falling limbs. Just north of the Massachusetts border, the same line of powerful storms caused the death of a New Hampshire man. Lenox Police Chief Stephen O’Brien reported that 56-year-old Darrin Cawthron of Derry, N.H. died when a large tree came down on his Ford F-150 pickup truck along Route 7, a major north-south highway that stretches south into Connecticut. The road was closed in Massachusetts for five hours. The National Weather Service reported near hurricane force winds of 70 mph associated with the line of storms that swept through Massachusetts and Connecticut. State police at Troop B in Canaan fielded more than a dozen storm related emergency calls for about two hours beginning at 5:30 p.m. Most of the reported wires and trees down were reported in Norfolk and Canaan areas.

New Hampshire man killed when a tree smashes onto his pickup in Lenox amid 70 mph winds

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/local/storm-lenox-fatal-new-hampshire-man/article_5ab657d2-02a6-11ed-93f9-4795466cb49e.html

LENOX — A supercell microburst storm caused widespread property damage in town Tuesday afternoon and claimed the life of a New Hampshire motorist when a tree crushed his pickup truck on Route 7 near the Lee town line. Darrin Cawthron, 56, of Derry, N.H., died when the large tree came down in the travel lane onto his Ford F-150 pickup, Lenox Police Sgt. Michael Smith said in a report released by Chief Stephen E. O’Brien Wednesday morning. Cawthron was the only occupant of the vehicle traveling on Route 7 at the intersection of Old Stockbridge Road, near the entrance to the Foxhollow condominiums. The incident came at 5:20 p.m., during the peak of the storm. The National Weather Service reported near-hurricane force winds of 70 mph at the time. The driver was pronounced dead at the scene, the police report says. There were no reported witnesses to the accident and no other vehicles were involved.

Massachusetts Senate passes reproductive rights bill

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/statehouse/mass-senate-passes-reproductive-rights-bill/article_00633a12-0309-11ed-ae4f-4fa761045ed3.html

Massachusetts lawmakers can get to work crafting a final reproductive rights bill following the Senate’s unanimous vote Wednesday, and distance between the branches on an approach to late-term abortions looms as a speedbump with the window for action closing. In the latest state-level volley prompted by a U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, the Senate voted 40-0 on a bill (S 2996) that would erect new legal shields for reproductive and gender-affirming care in Massachusetts, ban insurers from shifting abortion costs onto patients, and expand access to emergency contraceptives. No one spoke in opposition to the bill, and all three of the Senate’s Republicans voted in favor alongside the 37 Democrats. Senators opted against making many changes to the bill, which is at odds with language in the House bill permitting abortions after 24 weeks of pregnancy in cases of “severe” fetal anomalies. The branches have a matter of days to reconcile differences and produce a compromise to send to Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, who has not taken a public stance on the provision that divided the House and Senate but vetoed legislation two years ago that authorized late-term abortions in more cases.

Salisbury affordable housing plan site tour, info session on July 16

https://tricornernews.com

SALISBURY — The Salisbury Housing Committee will hold a site tour on Saturday, July 16, at 9 a.m. followed by a second information session on plans for affordable housing on a 5.3-acre lot near the town village. The information session is scheduled for 11 a.m. at the Salisbury Congregational Church to present plans and answer questions regarding access over the old railroad corridor to the proposed building lot off East Railroad Street.  

Volunteer for the town of Amenia 

https://tricornernews.com

The Town of Amenia is accepting applications for the following volunteer positions: (1) one unexpired position on the Board of Assessment Review; (2) two alternate Zoning Board of Appeal (ZBA) members; (2) two Wastewater Committee members; (1) one unexpired position for the Recreation Commission; (1) one Town Historian position and (2) two Conservation Advisory Council (CAC) members. Town residency is required for all of the volunteer positions. Letters of interest and a resume may be submitted via email to townclerk@ameniany.gov or via the regular mail, to Town Clerk Dawn Marie Klingner, 4988 Route 22 Amenia, NY 12501. The application deadline for all positions is noon on Thursday, July 28.  

BOE prepares for the new school year at organization meeting

https://tricornernews.com

The (PPCSD) Board of Education (BOE) gathered on Wednesday, July 6, to address the many appointments, authorizations and designations featured on its agenda for its annual organizational meeting. The BOE met in the Stissing Mountain Junior/Senior High School library at 7 p.m. and live-steamed the meeting through its website, www. ppcsd.org  

Kent board wants officer at the school

Kent board wants officer at the school

KENT – The Board of Education wants to have a school resource officer stationed in Kent Center School and it wants the selectmen to partially cover the cost of hiring a second state police trooper for the town. The school board voted 4-0 Monday evening to support the proposal and ask the selectmen to support the expenditure that is expected to be $187,000 annually. The selectmen will meet at 4 p.m. today for a special meeting. The school board wants to pay up to $150,000 and have the selectmen cover the remainder for the use of the trooper during the summer months. Superintendent Lisa Carter told the board she’d discussed with a Troop L sergeant that a school resource officer could be scheduled five days a week at KCS.

NY spends $10M to support care for out-of-state abortion seekers.

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/health/2022/07/12/ny-abortion-laws-state-spending-ten-millions-support-care-out-of-state-seekers/65372064007/

New York is spending $10 million to support 63 abortion clinics statewide in preparation for an anticipated increase in out-of-state residents seeking abortions in New York. The money is part of a new $25 million pool of state funding going to New York abortion providers in response to the Supreme Court last month overturning the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which established a constitutional right to abortion. Gov. Kathy Hochul revealed the initial list of clinics getting money during a media briefing in Manhattan on Tuesday, citing early reports of more abortion-seeking women coming to New York from other states that banned or severely restricted abortion access. “We’re at the very beginning of what we believe will be a major influx of people in search of women’s health care,” Hochul said, noting New York has a decades-long history of providing abortion access to people coming from out-of-state.

NYCLU sues State Police over records refusal

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/07/12/ny-state-police-sued-over-records/65371738007/

The New York Civil Liberties Union said last week it has filed a lawsuit against the New York State Police, contending the agency has improperly rejected its request for records alleging misconduct by troopers, including those that had previously been shielded by law from public view. The legal advocacy group, an offshoot of the American Civil Liberties Union, contends the records are subject to public disclosure as the result of legislation enacted two years ago that repealed a 1976 statute that exempted law enforcement disciplinary records from public disclosure requirements. “Police transparency is now codified into law, and police departments can no longer argue that they must be trusted to police themselves, immune from public scrutiny,” said Bobby Hodgson, NYCLU supervising attorney. The documents sought by the NYCLU include records of unsubstantiated and still pending allegations against police officers. A spokesman for State Police, William Duffy, said the litigation is being reviewed, adding the agency has no immediate comment on it.

Commission calls for $60 million in funding to support rural school districts

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/local/rural-schools-legislature-adam-hinds/article_8bd24556-0215-11ed-896a-3b418d5399a7.html

A state commission called Tuesday for a major funding increase for rural school districts. The Special Commission on Rural School Districts voted to recommend at least $60 million in appropriations to rural schools to address issues with transportation, declining enrollment and costs related to school choice and special education. The recommendation, made at the commission’s final meeting, would be a significant increase from the $4 million of rural school aid allocated in the General Appropriations Act for the fiscal year that ended June 30. State Rep. Natalie Blais, co-chair for the commission, noted that when spread out among the 67 districts eligible to receive rural school aid, the prior funding wasn’t enough. The allocation would come out to $59,701 per district, which is not enough to cover a teacher’s salary with benefits, she said.

New York pistol permit applicants will have to hand over social media accounts

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/07/08/ny-gun-applicants-will-have-to-provide-social-media-accounts/65369568007/

As missed warning signs pile up in investigations of mass killings, New York state is rolling out a novel strategy to screen applicants for gun permits. People seeking to carry concealed handguns will be required to hand over their social media accounts for a review of their “character and conduct.” It’s an approach applauded by many Democrats and national gun control advocacy groups, but some experts have raised questions about how the law will be enforced and address free speech concerns. Some of the local officials who will be tasked with reviewing the social media content also are asking whether they’ll have the resources and, in some cases, whether the law is even constitutional. Sheriffs haven’t received additional money or staffing to handle a new application process, said Peter Kehoe, the executive director of the New York Sheriffs’ Association. The law, he asserted, infringes on Second Amendment rights, and while applicants must list their social media accounts, he doesn’t think local officials will necessarily look at them. The new requirement, which takes effect in September, was included in a law passed last week that sought to preserve some limits on firearms after the Supreme Court ruled that most people have a right to carry a handgun for personal protection. It was signed by Gov. Kathy Hochul, a Democrat, who noted shooters sometimes telegraph their intent to hurt others.

Wastewater management project approved in Cornwall after multi-year battle

Wastewater management project approved in Cornwall after multi-year battle

CORNWALL — The wastewater management project for West Cornwall received the nod at a referendum Saturday. A total of 481 votes were cast with 302 citizens voting in favor of the plan, and 179 opposed. The issue has been in the forefront for six years when a study group was formed to determine how to address substandard wells and septic systems in the village. It was believed that upgrades would lead to revitalizing an area that had seen businesses shuttered and environmental concerns affecting the nearby Housatonic River and Mill Brook. First Selectman Gordon M. Ridgway, who was a vocal proponent of the proposal, and Todd Piker, chairman of the study committee, were on hand when the results came in at Town Hall. Both showed signs of relief upon hearing the affirmative vote. Ridgway expressed his thanks “to all who worked to solve the problems rather than ignore them. Now there’s good momentum for keeping the revitalization of the town going.” Piker said, “There’s nothing but work now. This is just the beginning.” Ridgway agreed, saying, “The vote was the easy part,” noting the study committee will now be reconfigured into a building committee. He gave special thanks to U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes, who helped secure a $3 million federal Community Project grant for the $6.3 million plan. The remainder will be secured through loans and/or grants from the USDA and municipal bonding. During one of two informational meetings held prior to the vote, Board of Finance Chairman Joe Pryor explained that several bond projects will be sunsetting as the new bonding comes into effect, so there would probably be little or no tax increases seen. Ridgway also praised Piker, engineer Steve MacDonnell, who came up with the design, and Cathy Weber, sanitarian with Torrington Area Health District, who provided much-needed assistance. “We’re in good shape as a town now,” he said.

Uncertainty plays part in plunging gas prices

Uncertainty plays part in plunging gas prices

WATERBURY — Compared to last month’s statewide record high of $4.89 per gallon, consumers are feeling some relief at the pump: the state’s gasoline prices have been declining for 27 consecutive days, according to a recent AAA report. The current average gas price is $4.64 per gallon, down 14 cents from a week ago and 34 cents from a month ago, but still up $1.53 from last year. Connecticut ranks 27th in national gas prices, although the state used to be much higher on the list. The state average is 4 cents lower than the national average of $4.68 per gallon. This decline in price is credited to decreased global oil prices, according to Alec Slatky, the director of public and government affairs for AAA Northeast.

New York COVID cases up 5% as BA.5 subvariant outbreaks creep upstate

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/07/11/new-york-covid-cases-up-ba-5-subvariant-outbreak/65370604007/

New York’s weekly COVID-19 tally increased about 5% last week as the omicron BA.5 subvariant that began spreading recently in New York City and on Long Island creeped into Westchester County and pockets of upstate. New York reported 43,641 new COVID-19 cases in the week ending Sunday, up from 41,642 new cases the prior week. New York ranked 20th among the states where coronavirus was spreading the fastest on a per-person basis, a USA TODAY Network analysis of Johns Hopkins University data shows. In New York, however, rising numbers of COVID-19 hospitalizations offered a clearer picture of the virus’ spread in recent weeks. About 3,900 likely COVID-19 patients were admitted last week across New York, up about 20% from the weekly tally a month ago. The lingering threat of COVID-19 outbreaks this summer differed from prior years of the pandemic when case counts and hospitalization rates plummeted each summer, mainly due to people spending more time outdoors. One reason is the omicron subvariants − including the BA.5 strain that recently became dominant − have proven effective at evading immunity from prior infections and vaccination, despite causing seemingly less severe illness than prior strains.

Supreme Judicial Court upholds mail-in, early voting law in Massachusetts

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/statehouse/supreme-judicial-court-upholds-mail-in-early-voting-law-in-massachusetts/article_f2fa9476-0171-11ed-8383-3b1a7824f02a.html

With the state Supreme Judicial Court having rejected his challenge to the new law making early voting and vote-by-mail permanent features of elections here, MassGOP Chairman James Lyons said Monday that he plans to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court to “provide relief to prevent a constitutional travesty.” Lyons and a handful of Republican candidates filed a lawsuit last month seeking to overturn the so-called VOTES Act, which made voting-by-mail permanent in Massachusetts. The plaintiffs argued last week before the SJC that the VOTES Act, which codified pandemic-era policies that proved popular with voters, violates the allowances for absentee voting contained in Article 105 of the state Constitution and that Secretary of State William Galvin should be blocked from sending mail-in ballot applications to the more than 4.7 million voters in Massachusetts. The court ruled in an order Monday morning that “judgment shall enter in the county court for the Secretary on all claims in the plaintiffs’ complaint” and that “the plaintiffs’ request to enjoin the Secretary from putting the VOTES act into effect is denied.” The ruling clears the way for Galvin to begin sending ballot applications by the July 23 deadline called for in the law, though he said he intends to beat the deadline.

Free Pediatric COVID Vaccine Clinic

Tuesday July 12th 9 am – 3pm Sharon Primary Care
29 Hospital Hill Rd Sharon, CT
Ages 6 mos-11 Pfizer and Moderna Available
All Children are Welcome!!

Canaan Railroad Days is proud to be celebrating its 58th year in bringing an amazing festival to the Northwest Corner of North Canaan, CT.

Canaan Railroad Days starts Wednesday July 13th, 2022 and ends Sunday July 17th, 2022 with the Fireworks on Saturday July 16th. The Carnival will be July 13th-July 16th.

Millions of the Connecticut’s ash trees are tumbling down

Millions of the state’s ash trees are tumbling down

Mortally infested by the iridescent green emerald ash borer beetle, millions of the state’s disease-ridden ash trees are tumbling down. Three years of infestation have taken a toll. Despite municipal budgets set aside to cut them safely down and an effort by utility companies to identify them before they cause outages, the falling trees pose a hazard. The culprit is what the U.S. Forest Service says is the most costly invasive insect ever. Much as the nation lost its elms to Dutch Elm Disease and chestnuts to blight, nearly all ash trees could eventually succumb. “It’s fair to say that all ash trees will succumb, in pockets more dramatically than others,” said State Forester Chris Martin. Scientists say there is hope that another beetle species, also from Asia, could be set free to feed on the emerald ash larvae. Testing is underway to determine whether the half inch long beetles are safe in U.S. Forest Service sites in southeastern Michigan. In Connecticut, parasitic wasps have been released to munch on the beetle larvae, though there is no widespread documented benefit as of yet. Biologists are also hopeful that seedlings growing from tree roots eventually will develop a virulence to the bugs. With few healthy ash trees left to chew on, biologists believe the bugs will run out of things to eat and die off. By then, Martin said enough biocontrol will be in place to keep the bugs from waiting on young saplings to grow.

Great Barrington firefighters lift a dump truck off a man pinned under a cab

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/crime/great-barrington-man-pinned-dump-truck-rescue-firefighters/article_3f6fa5f0-fec8-11ec-b0d9-67c4e79b2f80.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — Firefighters used airbags to quickly lift a large dump truck that had overturned Thursday, pinning a man under the cab. The man, who is in his 50s, was in serious but stable condition, and airlifted to Baystate Medical Center from a makeshift landing zone at Bard College at Simon’s Rock. The accident happened sometime just before 10:30 a.m. on Burning Tree Road. Paramedics helped the man while town firefighters used a rescue engine to stabilize the truck. Sheffield firefighters also assisted in setting up the helicopter landing zone at Simon’s Rock. 

Village of Millerton – Organizational Study of Police Department

The Village of Millerton (the “Village”) is requesting proposals from qualified parties for an organizational study to be completed for the Police Department.

Project Background and Description:
The Village Board identified a need for an organizational study of the Village Police Department. The Village Police Department currently has seven part-time police officers listed on the Civil Service roster plus one part-time police officer assigned to the Town of North East Town Court and one part-time “Senior Police Assistant”. There is currently no police chief or sergeant. The Village is seeking a neutral and experienced review by a third-party professional consultant to evaluate and compare the Village of Millerton police services with those of other comparable municipalities. The analysis will assess the traditional core services currently being provided and also the operational costs including employee compensation and benefits. The final deliverable will include a full report to be completed in a reasonable amount of time.

Estimated Timeline:
Proposals Due July 29, 2022
Village Board will review the proposals, confer with counsel, and anticipates choosing a successful bidder within 4-6 weeks.

NY DEC announces six new certified Climate Smart communities

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the latest round of communities to achieve certification as part of New York State’s Climate Smart Communities program, which supports local efforts to meet the economic, social, and environmental challenges posed by climate change. By taking meaningful steps to mitigate and adapt to climate change, six local governments successfully met the criteria to be recognized as leaders during the second quarter round of review. “DEC applauds the work of these six communities helping address the climate crisis by acting locally and bolstering New York State’s climate leadership,” Commissioner Seggos said. “We look forward to working with our Climate Smart Communities and other local leaders who are ramping up clean energy, improving climate resiliency, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, among other actions, to benefit quality of life and advance the State’s climate goals.” New York’s new bronze-certified Climate Smart Communities locally are the towns of Ancram, North East. The certification program launched in 2014 to document and celebrate the accomplishments of communities taking climate action. There are now 94 total certified Climate Smart Communities in New York State, nine silver and 85 bronze.

Sharon ‘Let Them Eat Cake!’ auction rakes in $50,000

The “Let Them Eat Cake!” auction was more like an art show. The 26 confectionary entries were intricately designed and executed, similar to how paintings are created. Held by Sharon Historical Society & Museum on July 1, the popular event draws on local bakers to donate a cake. Auctioneers then seek to cajole attendees to bid generously. This year’s auctioneers were Christopher Robinson and Brian Ross, who masterfully carried out their task. Asked what their method was just before they took the podium, Robinson replied, “I tell people to bid early and often.” Held under a tent on the society’s grounds on the town Green, the auction also featured hors d’oeuvres and drinks. Robert Lindgren and Marel Rogers were co-chairs of the event. Lindgren said approximately $50,000 in gross revenue was raised, “which was a record.” Two of the entries each garnered $2,000: one was a strawberry shortcake, using all local ingredients and baked by Emma Isakoff, the pastry chef at Troutbeck resort in Amenia, N.Y. The other was Rebecca Baum’s cherry cheesecake made with local cherries. Four other cakes sold for $1,000 or more. The proceeds just from the sale of the cakes totaled just over $20,000.

Flying magazine highlights Great Barrington in its July issue

GREAT BARRINGTON — The world’s most popular aviation magazine highlighted the town and its airport this month, noting a handful of things to do after landing at Walter J. Koladza Airport — or KBGR, as pilots call it. The Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, the W.E.B. Du Bois National Historic Site, GB Eats, The Guthrie Center, Monument Mountain and The Barrington hotel are included in Flying Magazine’s July 1 “Destinations” piece by Jonathan Welsh, a private pilot and former reporter, editor and columnist at The Wall Street Journal. Welsh landed at Koladza last month and used one of the airport’s “crew cars” that are available for pilots who want to head into town or sightsee. Flying’s circulation is 160,000 for each print issue and 410,000 on its website, according to the Chattanooga Times Free Press in a story about the magazine’s purchase by a Chattanooga businessman last year. It also has 450,000 followers on social media. The airport has been under scrutiny over noise and other issues in recent years as it tried to build new hangars, but lost a permit bid due, in part, to opposition from some abutters and neighbors. It preexists zoning rules, allowing it to operate in a rural residential area without town permitting. Several residents launched a legal battle that could shut the airfield down, and that is pending in court.

After more than two years of Covid restrictions and the last year of gathering, archiving, and negotiating, Chris Keane is presenting the paintings of Carl T Linden (1904-1981) for a limited time only at the Maplebrook School AIM 

Maplebrook – Exciting happening!!!! After more than two years of Covid restrictions and the last year of gathering, archiving, and negotiating, Chris Keane is presenting the paintings of Carl T Linden (1904-1981) for a limited time only at the Maplebrook School AIM Gallery at 5142 NY Route 22. Carl T. Linden spent the last years of his life in Amenia NY living with his daughter, Ann Linden.

The opening is this Friday July 8, from 6-8 pm in the AIM Gallery located in Alumni Hall on the main campus. If you cannot make the show at that time, please contact the school for an appointment at artgallery@maplebrookschool.org  or call Jessica at 845-373-9511 x 253.

Great Barrington’s Summer Concert Series

The town of Great Barrington’s summer concert series at the gazebo behind Town Hall on Main Street continues as the Wanda Houston band take center stage on Friday, July 8th from 5:30 to 7:15 pm….all shows are weather permitting.

Sandisfield Arts Center 

The Sandisfield Arts Center presents a mini-ukulele fest on Saturday, July 9th….the free event begins at 4 pm with a performance featuring singer-songwriter Bernice Lewis and members of the Berkshire ukulele band.

NorthWest Passage at Rudd Pond this Sat at 6:30!

Rudd Pond this Sat. 6:30 – 8:00 for Home Spun Summer Fun! 

Millerton Library Summer Concert Series is hosting music at Rudd Pond the setting is under a huge old oak tree with the pond in the background.  

Discover Falls Village Artisan Crafts Market & Tag Sale

The David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, Connecticut, will host an Artisan Crafts Market on the library’s lawn on Saturday July 9, and a Giant Tag Sale at the Center on Main on Saturday and Sunday July 9 and 10, 10AM to 3PM. Both events are part of the Discover Falls Village Weekend highlighting the businesses, cultural offerings, and local artisans in the second smallest town in the state, most within walking distance along its classical New England town center on Main Street.  

The Sharon Fire Department AMBULANCE squad

TAKE OUT Pancake Breakfast
SUNDAY, JULY 12TH from 7:30 am until 10:30 AM at the Sharon Firehouse.

$7.00/per take out includes:  Pancakes, French Toast, Eggs, Potatoes, Sausage and Bacon

Great Barrington police release the name of the Connecticut biker killed in July 4th crash

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/crime/great-barrington-motorcycle-crash-danbury-conn-route-7/article_b3d8ea72-fd34-11ec-9c71-5fa86cd75d7c.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — Police have released the name of Connecticut man who was killed after the motorcycle he was riding collided with a car on Route 7 on Monday afternoon. Antonio Desousa, 68, of Danbury, Conn., died of injures suffered in the crash after being airlifted to Albany Medical Center.
A preliminary investigation indicates that Desousa’s Harley Davidson collided with a grey Honda Accord driven by Tandoh Devine, 22, when Devine crossed the northbound lane to turn into the Bistro Box roadside eatery driveway. Great Barrington Police are asking anyone who witnessed the accident to contact the department as they seek more information for the ongoing investigation. The crash is being investigated by Great Barrington Police, the Massachusetts State Police Collision, Analysis & Reconstruction Section Unit and the Berkshire County District Attorney’s Office. Any witnesses to the crash are asked to call Great Barrington police at 413-329-6871.

The Board of Finance for the Town of Sharon is seeking applicants to fill a vacancy as an Alternate member.

The applicant must be a registered voter of the Town with certain restrictions on affiliation per minority representation. This position will automatically be on the ballot for the Town election in November 2023.

Please send a letter of interest with a resume to Tina Pitcher, Board Secretary at Town Hall or to tina_p@sharon-ct.org by July 22nd. Questions can be directed to Ms. Pitcher or Board Chair Tom Bartram at thbartram@gmail.com

DEEP issues draft hazardous tree policy

https://tricornernews.com

The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) on Saturday, July 1, issued a draft policy for its management of hazardous trees in state parks and campgrounds, triggered by last winter’s controversial tree-cutting at Housatonic Meadows State Park. The General Assembly passed legislation in May that requires DEEP to establish a policy for its management of hazardous trees. Lawmakers were responding to public outcry over the extent of DEEP’s removal of more than 100 oak and pine trees at the popular and scenic park on the Housatonic River. The legislative effort gained some initial traction but appeared doomed until its provisions were folded into a broader environmental measure, Public Act 22-143, which passed. DEEP’s new policy, which will be the subject of a virtual public meeting on Monday, July 11, calls for it to: consult with a licensed arborist “prior to the designation and removal or mitigation of a hazard tree; advance notice to the public, including signage and posting online; consideration of replanting and other relevant improvements to offset the aesthetic or ecological value of a tree that is removed.

Norfolk Food Pantry feeling the squeeze from inflation

Norfolk Food Pantry feeling the squeeze from inflation

Soaring prices for groceries and gas have increased demand at the Norfolk Food Pantry while donations have decreased, Director Lynn Deasy said. Deasy noted there was an increase in usage in 2020 during the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic, but said demand is even higher now. Deasy said donations, meanwhile, have diminished. The pantry is housed in Battell Chapel adjacent to the Congregational Church, but it is not affiliated with the church. The Church of Christ has been helping to offset the lack of donations through its minister’s discretionary fund. Those wishing to directly donate perishables, such as butter, meat, milk and fresh vegetables, can bring them to the pantry Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. A volunteer will accept them. Donation boxes for nonperishables can be found at Berkshire Country Store, Battell Chapel, Immaculate Conception Church, Church of the Transfiguration and Norfolk Library.

Salisbury info session airs affordable housing plan

https://tricornernews.com

SALISBURY – The Salisbury Housing Committee held the first of two public information meetings Thursday, June 30, at the Salisbury Congregational Church on plans for 18 to 20 affordable housing units
near the village proposed to be built on a 5.3-acre parcel of donated land. More than 50 residents attended the meeting, asking questions about the plan and right-of-way access to the site over the old railroad corridor adjacent to the Railroad Ramble trail, known as the Rail Trail. The land has been given to the nonprofit SHC by adjoining property owner Jim Dresser. Jocelyn Ayer, vice president of the SHC, opened the meeting with a slide presentation and explained that before the planning can move forward with design work and Planning and Zoning permitting, they must first obtain access to the land over the railroad corridor. A second information session is scheduled Saturday, July 16, at 11 a.m. at the church and a town meeting vote is scheduled for Thursday, July 28, at 7:30 p.m., also at the church.

Webutuck High School has new principal, Robert Knuschke

https://tricornernews.com

After a meticulous search for a leader to step into what seemed like an impossible position to fill — principal at Webutuck High School. The Webutuck Central School District’s Board of Education announced it hired Robert Knuschke as its new principal earlier this year. Knuschke’s first day was Friday, July 1. He follows on the heels of popular WHS Principal Katy McEnroe, whose retirement became official on June 30.

Village Board approves upgrades to Little League field at park

https://tricornernews.com

MILLERTON — With construction moving forward at Millerton Community Park formerly known as Eddie Collins Memorial Field, the Village Board was asked to approve, in concept, suggested improvements to the park’s Little League field at its special workshop in May. Save Village Trustee Laurie Kerr who was absent, the majority of village trustees attended the May 24 meeting at Village Hall at 6 p.m. After some discussion on the 24th, the board unanimously approved the proposed improvements to the Little League Field in concept.

HILLSDALE NY Climate Carnival Clothing Drive July 1-16

Hillsdale’s Climate Smart Task Force is sponsoring a clothing Drive. Bring unworn or gently used to the Climate Carnival “Pop Up” free store. Drop off at Hillsdale’s firehouse (backdoor vestibule) 9387 State Route 22. The door will be open 24/7.

Mobile clinic summer hours in Salisbury

Community Health and Wellness mobile medical unit will be at the Salisbury SVNA, 30A Salmon Kill Road, on the following Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 11 on July 7, July 21, August 4 and August 18. e clinic can provide medical screenings and examinations, point-of-care testing, along with COVID
and other lab tests. also provide vaccinations, Covid vaccines by appointment, assistance with health insurance enrollment, and referrals for specialty care at their Winsted and Torrington office. For more information call 860 387-0801.

Maplebrook School AIM Gallery

Maplebrook – Exciting happening!!!! After more than two years of Covid restrictions and the last year of gathering, archiving, and negotiating, Chris Keane is presenting the paintings of Carl T Linden (1904-1981) for a limited time only at the Maplebrook School AIM Gallery at 5142 NY Route 22. Carl T. Linden spent the last years of his life in Amenia NY living with his daughter, Ann Linden. The opening is this Friday July 8, from 6-8 pm in the AIM Gallery located in Alumni Hall on the main campus. If you cannot make the show at that time, please contact the school for an appointment at artgallery@maplebrookschool.org or call Jessica at 845-373-9511 x 253.

Discover Falls Village Artisan Crafts Market & Tag Sale

The David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, Connecticut, will host an Artisan Crafts Market on the library’s lawn on Saturday July 9, and a Giant Tag Sale at the Center on Main on Saturday and Sunday July 9 and 10, 10AM to 3PM. Both events are part of the Discover Falls Village Weekend highlighting the businesses, cultural offerings, and local artisans in the second smallest town in the state, most within walking distance along its classical New England town center on Main Street.  

Falls Village – Car & Motorcycle Show

July 10, 2022 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

34 Railroad Street, Falls Village

Featured on My Classic Car TV Show! A Really Big Show in a Really Small Town! Huge variety of vehicles! Food, live music, vendors, entertainment, something for everyone in a quaint village setting. Trophies & dash plaques. $10 entry fee, spectators free! Benefits The Falls Village Volunteer Fire Dept.

Noble Horizons 50th Anniversary Community Picnic

Community Picnic – 50th Anniversary Celebration

July 12, 2022 rain date July 13, 2022 4:30 PM to 7:30 PM

Noble Horizons – 17 Cobble Road, Salisbury CT

Food prepared by the Lakeville Hose Company

Music by the Salisbury Band

Cost:  $15 per person, $40 per family

What’s included: Wine, beer, Harney tea; BBQ chicken, coleslaw, baked beans, potato salad, roll, ice cream and birthday cake! *Vegetarian option available.

Fees for the event will be collected upon arrival. Check or cash would be preferred. If you prefer to pay with a credit card you can contact Michele Burns at 860-435-9851 x 188 or email mburns@churchhomes.org.

Sharon Audubon has received an expansion grant

Sharon Audubon has received an expansion grant which allows us to hold an additional summer camp session per week for kids going into Kindergarten through 6th grade! Spaces are now available for the week of July 11-15 (The Best Nest.) Register online here: https://sharon.audubon.org/summer-camp

Scholarships are also available for those in need of financial assistance. Contact Wendy at the Center for more info!

Police are seeking witnesses to Great Barrington crash after biker dies of injuries

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/great-barrington-crash-motorcycle-route-7/article_876650a6-fc6c-11ec-808d-5b5468270849.html

The man, 68, died of injuries suffered when a car and bike collided as the car attempted to turn into the Bistro Box driveway at approximately 12 p.m., according to a statement from Great Barrington Police Chief Paul Storti. The man’s name is being withheld pending notification of his family. A preliminary investigation indicates a grey, 2019 Honda Accord driven by Tandoh Devine, 22, of Pittsfield, was turning left into the roadside eatery lot from the southbound lane when it crossed the path of the northbound rider on his 2006 Harley Davidson, Storti said. The rider suffered severe injuries and was airlifted to Albany Medical Center. The driver and passengers of the Honda escaped injury. The crash is being investigated by Great Barrington Police, the Massachusetts State Police Collision, Analysis & Reconstruction Section Unit and the Berkshire County District Attorney’s Office.

Garden tribute to late veteran Simonds

IN YOUR CORNER: Garden tribute to late veteran Simonds

In life, David Simonds didn’t speak much about his experience of fighting in the Vietnam War. But his buddies at Couch-Pipa VFW Post 6851 knew about his military service and how beloved he was as a businessman and friend in Canaan. So when he died March 17, plans began to formulate about how to preserve his memory. Kirk Harrington, post commander, came up with the idea of a memorial garden, and while it is still a work in progress, much already has been done to honor Simonds. It was dedicated June 4, when following tradition, a number of Charlie Company 2nd 506th Infantry BN 101st Airborne comrades came from all over the country to attend. Simonds was known for loyally attending memorials for his fellow soldiers. After the land was cleared, a stone wall was built and a gazebo erected on a knoll north of the post building. Two coins with the company’s insignia are embedded into the floor and paintings replicating the screaming eagle’s insignia are on the fence. They were created by local artist Beth Miller. Eventually, three concrete benches will be placed at the location, as will a plaque designating the David C. Simonds Memorial Garden. The auxiliary has begun a fundraiser to help maintain the garden by selling brick pavers that can have an engraving chosen by the purchaser. Harrington envisions a path in which they may wend their way from the gazebo to the garden and around it. The 4-foot-by-8-foot bricks cost $100 each. Auxiliary President Grace Kelly said purchases can be made throughout the summer and she’ll be placing the order in September. A flower garden, ablaze with summertime colors, sits near the gazebo. In it, a large white stone stands erect. Harrington said it is engraved with the word “Currahee,” the battle cry of the 101st Airborne, because it resembles a mountain. There’s also one tomato plant, representing Simonds’ love for the fruit. The VFW and its auxiliary joined forces to make the project a reality.

New York COVID cases rise 15% as omicron BA.5 subvariant spreads: Latest

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/07/05/new-york-covid-cases-rise-omicron-ba-5-spreads/65366714007/

New York’s weekly tally of COVID-19 cases increased nearly 15% last week, as the omicron BA.5 subvariant fueled outbreaks on Long Island and in New York City while upstate counties remained at low risk of infection and hospital strain. New York reported 41,642 new COVID-19 cases in the week ending Sunday. That’s up from 36,317 cases the previous week. New York ranked 21st among the states where coronavirus was spreading the fastest on a per-person basis, a USA TODAY Network analysis of Johns Hopkins University data shows. Nationally, COVID-19 cases increased nearly 12% from the week before, with 800,077 cases reported. Across the country, 38 states had more cases in the latest week than they did in the week before.

New York Shuts Down Olivet University Amid Federal Money-Laundering Probe

In a statement on its website, Olivet University made no mention of Murphy’s reasons or its appeal of the education department’s decision. “Olivet University always envisioned multiple uses for our Dover location beyond the school itself,” the statement said. The sprawling Dover campus, a former psychiatric hospital in Dutchess County, about 80 miles north of Manhattan, would be used to “serve evangelicals from around the world more than ever,” Olivet said, and would soon host a mission center, a business center, sports and entertainment facilities, a hospital, a technology park and an “evangelical themed museum.”

Update on Olivet property in Dover:

Olivet University’s Dover property will be used to serve evangelicals from around the world more than ever, with a variety of facilities and envisioned uses including space for the worldwide evangelical community, a technology park and Christian innovation center, a hospital to serve the mission community, a “business as mission” center, a sports center, and an evangelical-themed museum, and an entertainment complex, among others. It was a struggle to develop the Dover property for Olivet University and the Evangelical Center at the same time. Olivet University New York will be stepping back from offering credit-bearing courses for now, with the intention of diligently seeking to open a chartered institution at the right time and place in New York – an intention expressed in our charter application currently pending with the New York State Education Department.

Meanwhile, our Dover property can fully serve our alumni and friends by being used to meet the Evangelical Center’s pressing needs for space, as well as for non-credit bearing religious training.

Salisbury Town Meeting July 7th, 7:00 PM

There will be a Salisbury Town Meeting on Thursday, July 7, at 7 pm via Zoom webinar. On the agenda is a vote to transfer the town-owned lot at 17 Perry St (former site of Decker’s Laundry) to the Salisbury Housing Trust for the purpose of constructing houses for affordable home ownership. Please join the Zoom to vote for this agenda item.

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/87273742843…

Torrington man dies in motorcycle crash

Torrington man dies in motorcycle crash

NORFOLK- A 21-year-old Torrington motorcyclist died Sunday afternoon after failing to negotiate a curve along Route 44. State police said Nicholas Ponzi, of 686 Heron Dr., was eastbound along Route 44 at 4:10 p.m. when for unknown reasons he failed to negotiate a righthand curve just south of Route 272. The Suzuki motorcycle, owned by Bethel Automotive Services in Bethel, continued straight off the roadway, striking a stone wall. Ponzi was treated by first responders from Norfolk Ambulance and taken to Winsted Health Center with serious injuries where he later died.

NY passes gun, abortion measures in response to Supreme Court rulings

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/state/2022/07/02/new-york-enacts-new-rules-carrying-guns-supreme-court-ruling/65365714007/

New York lawmakers delivered swift responses on Friday to a pair of Supreme Court decisions rendered last week, enacting new restrictions on carrying guns in public and proposing an amendment to the state constitution to protect abortion rights. The Democratic-led Legislature, gathered for the second day of a special session called by Gov. Kathy Hochul, passed a bill that outlaws guns in a long list of “sensitive locations,” from bars and subways to government buildings and Times Square, and sets other new rules such as required firearms training. That measure was drafted in answer to a June 23 court decision that dismantled New York’s century-old limitation on who may carry concealed handguns outside their homes. Lawmakers also passed a proposed constitutional amendment to protect abortion rights by expanding protections against discrimination. That proposal, which would be put to voters if approved again by the Legislature, was added to the agenda for the special session in the wake of the June 24 court decision overturning the national right to abortion set by the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling.

Foes of a planned PCB landfill make a new pitch to be heard by the Lee health board

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/central_berkshires/lee-board-of-health-asked-to-decide-fate-of-proposed-pcb-dump/article_2b92fce0-f887-11ec-8259-57a78926735e.html

LEE — A leading opponent of the planned PCB disposal site in town wants the Lee Board of Health to intervene on the matter. The board doubts it holds the power to do so. The Housatonic River Initiative has formally asked the three-person panel to hold a public hearing and eventually vote on whether to seek to block the Upland Disposal Facility from being built in a former quarry just south of Woods Pond. That facility is now planned to be the burial point for roughly a million cubic yards of soil and sediment with relatively lower levels of PCB contamination. The Housatonic River cleanup continues long efforts by environmental regulators to contend with the legacy of the General Electric Co.’s pollution of the water body. The health board has yet to decide if it will hold a hearing, but has indicated it may lack the power to prevent the landfill from being part of the Rest of River cleanup, as spelled out by the federal Environmental Protection Agency. The health board chair has advised Gray that it may be unable to intervene.

Salisbury minister works to allow others to heal through forgiveness

Salisbury minister works to allow others to heal through forgiveness

Eileen Epperson aims to help people who harbor longtime resentment against those who have wronged them. The minister, who has served as a clergy, worked as a trained interim minister and has been a hospital and hospice chaplain, is now a forgiveness coach, believing that holding onto bitterness serves no purpose and can even be harmful. During a recent conversation, Epperson shared that she held a lot of anger from her childhood against her parents, who divorced when she was young. She also found that many of her parishioners were filled with guilt and resentment. Thirty years ago, she came in contact with Father Jerry, a Roman Catholic priest, who declared he was a man of forgiveness. He created what he called the Forgiveness Project that includes conversations and questions for those who want to change. He became a strong mentor for her. “I began to see how much I didn’t forgive,” Epperson said. She said in her coaching she tells people that forgiveness doesn’t let anyone off the hook. It doesn’t relieve anyone of responsibilities. Forgiveness frees the forgiver. She also advises “They don’t have to hang on to stuff.” She has them go through everything they are upset about until there is nothing left.

Kent meeting presents residents opportunity to discuss future

Kent meeting presents residents opportunity to discuss future

Residents took advantage of the opportunity in a public information meeting Thursday to share questions and ideas with the Planning and Zoning Commission regarding the draft of the 10-year update to the town’s plan of conservation and development. Some of the suggestions included some more detailed recommendations regarding reaching climate goals based on the state’s adopted goals, including detailed recommendations regarding traffic signs and speed changes in the center of town, specific references to improvements in cultural resources and specificity in the action steps for sustainability. Planner Glenn Chalder of Planimetrics presented the summary of the plan, highlighting some of the differences from the 2012 plan. The new 108-page plan is organized in four theme areas: sustainability/resilience, community assets, development and infrastructure. Each section contains suggested policies and action steps in red type, along with leaders/partners identified for implementation. A community survey was conducted over five weeks in the fall of 2021 and 432 people responded. Some of their input was incorporated into the plan. Also included is preliminary date from the 2020 census, which Chalder said still has not been finalized. He shared population information that shows the official population had finally broken 3,000 people. However, there is a sidebar note about the impact of the pandemic regarding “a number of second homes in Kent (units kept for seasonal or occasional use) became the primary residence for their owners. It remains to be seen whether this will become a new baseline population for Kent or whether prior living patterns will resume.”

The Sharon Historical Society & Museum Announces the Opening of The Summer Show Juried Exhibition and Sale

The Gallery @the SHS – July 16 through August 26, 2022

SHARON, CT: Gallery SHS of the Sharon Historical Society & Museum presents “The Summer Show”, a juried exhibition and sale of artworks by local artists. The exhibit runs from July 16 through August 26, 2022. An opening reception to which the public is invited free of charge will be held on Saturday, July16 from 5:00 to 7:00PM. Artists were invited to submit works in any medium (e.g. Oil, Acrylic, Watercolor, Photography, Pastel, Ink, Graphite, Drawing, Print, Mixed Media, Sculpture, Assemblage, Fabric, Stone, Clay, Metal) and depicting any subject. The limitless possibilities promise that the show will have something for every taste, style and pocketbook! Cash prizes will be awarded to three works selected by the show’s judge. In addition, guests who attend the show’s opening night will have the opportunity to select their favorite work of art which will receive the “SHS Crowd Pleaser” award. A portion of all sales supports the Sharon Historical Society & Museum’s mission. Gallery SHS is located at the Sharon Historical Society & Museum, 18 Main Street, Route 41, Sharon, CT. The gallery and museum are open Wednesday through Friday from 12-4, Saturday 10-2 and by appointment. For more information and directions to Gallery SHS, call (860) 364-5688. For additional information about the Sharon Historical Society & Museum, visit www.sharonhist.org

Sharon Audubon has received an expansion grant

Sharon Audubon has received an expansion grant which allows us to hold an additional summer camp session per week for kids going into Kindergarten through 6th grade! Spaces are now available for the week of July 11-15 (The Best Nest.) Register online here: https://sharon.audubon.org/summer-camp

Scholarships are also available for those in need of financial assistance. Contact Wendy at the Center for more info!

The Ancram Town Pool will be open July 5 to August 31.

Open swimming: 

Mon, Wed & Fri 1pm to 6pm;

Tues, Thurs, Sat & Sun 10am to 6pm. 

Swimming Lessons:  Mon, Wed, Fri 9-1.

Swimming Lesson testing:  

July 5th and 6th from 9am to 1pm weather permitting;

To sign up for testing and lessons, please speak to a lifeguard.

Lessons will begin July 11th.

2022 Fees

Town of Ancram and Ancram Fire District Residents – FREE

Other Residents

Daily Use (per person) $3

Family Season Pass (Up to 6 people) $50

 Some important information:

 • Please be aware that our Town Kids Camp uses the pool for free swims Mon, Wed and Fri from 1 to 3 pm. The pool continues to be open to the public at that time, but we want you to know ahead of time that the Camp will also be using the pool during those hours. 

• The pool and the ball field are smoke free facilities. 

Amenia FD Carnival Food Night & Fireworks Sunday 4 PM – 9 PM

Great carnival food, Steak Sandwiches, Sausage & Pepper Grinders, Hamburgers, Hot Dogs (with all fix-ins), French Fries, Fried Dough, and beverages!! After the food, stay and enjoy the fire work show at 9!!!

For details regarding this event, please contact Shawn Howard (845) 418-8633

July 4 Area Celebrations

Poughkeepsie:
The fireworks display will begin between 8:15 and 8:30 p.m. and can be viewed from the city’s waterfront parks near the Walkway Over the Hudson.

Walkway Over the Hudson: Ticketholders will be permitted onto the Walkway from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. for special viewing of the city of Poughkeepsie’s fireworks display which is set to light up the night sky between 8:15 and 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 for those age 11 and older, $15 for people 65 and older, veterans, and Walkway members. Children ages 10 and younger are free, but need tickets to enter. Ticketholders may enter from either side of the Walkway. For more information, go to walkway.org/event/fireworks-over-the-hudson-river

Kingston:
Fireworks return to Rondout Creek between 9 and 9:30 p.m. Check out facebook.com/olesavannah for more information.

Kent library gala celebrates centennial

Kent library gala celebrates centennial

This year’s gala for Kent Memorial Library felt much more like a normal year, with perfect weather, no masks and no checks for vaccination cards. President Sandy Edelman welcomed guests and noted it is a special anniversary year for the library. “As we celebrate our centennial, we want to recognize that the library is the beating heart of our town,” she said at the June 25 event. “We serve every segment of the community. We bring information and programs to everyone. We are the little library that could.” The honorary co-chairs of the gala, Nancy Kissinger and Annette de la Renta, both were unable to attend. The party was held at the Walker House on Macedonia Brook Road, owned by Kent School. The food was created by the school’s head chef, Darin Hudson. Guests milled around under a large tent and spilled outside to gather at tables on a summer evening with comfortable temperatures. Edelman spoke of the library’s plans for the future, which include renovation of the former firehouse and creation of outdoor space. She also asked the attendees to continue their financial support of the endeavors.

Cornwall exhibit focuses on treatment of minorities in area

Cornwall exhibit focuses on treatment of minorities in area

The story of Naomi and Obadiah Freeman is a compelling one and central to this year’s exhibit at Cornwall Historical Society. Titled “Finding Freeman/s,” it sheds light not only on the enslaved Black and indigenous people who once lived in town, but also gives insight about the treatment of minorities in America before the Civil War. The show was curated by Frank Mitchell, a cultural organizer in visual arts and public humanities, and curatorial adviser at the Toni N. and Wendell C. Harp Historical Museum at Dixwell Q. House. He is a member of the Connecticut Humanities, appointed in December by Gov. Ned Lamont. A grant from Connecticut Humanities helped fund the exhibit. The show stems from archaeological research conducted in 2013 by Ryan Bachman of Norfolk, a doctoral student in history, and Ann Schillinger, a Cornwall resident. They studied the property once owned by Naomi Freeman, as well as documents, such as tax records, shop ledgers and census information. The exhibit features an array of panels with descriptions of life during that time. One states that the documents uncovered by Bachman and Schillinger “help to outline a community of African Americans and indigenous Cornwall residents whose names and stories are not reflected in contemporary histories, relationships and impact, yet those residents left centuries of history to inform and instruct.” The show runs through Oct. 15 at 7 Pine St.

West Cornwall house fire causes heavy damage

West Cornwall house fire causes heavy damage

No one was injured when an early morning fire ripped through a West Cornwall home, causing heavy damage. Thanks to a quick response from local and mutual aid departments, the house at 35 Dibble Hill Road was saved, said Fred Scoville III, the local fire chief. The initial call was dispatched at 4:45 a.m., after Gary and Bette Halby awoke to find flames spreading. Fire was visible through the roof by the time they exited the home at dawn. Additional fire crews soon were summoned from Sharon, Lakeville, Canaan, Kent, Warren and Goshen. Other mutual aid agencies stood by in local firehouses. The fire was brought under control just after 6 a.m., Scoville said. Water to fight the fire at the remote location had to be delivered by tankers up the narrow road. Water also was drawn from a pool on the property using a portable pump to transfer it into a pumper. The house suffered water damage and is uninhabitable, but it can be repaired.

NY passes gun, abortion measures in response to Supreme Court rulings

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/state/2022/07/02/new-york-enacts-new-rules-carrying-guns-supreme-court-ruling/65365714007/

New York lawmakers delivered swift responses on Friday to a pair of Supreme Court decisions rendered last week, enacting new restrictions on carrying guns in public and proposing an amendment to the state constitution to protect abortion rights. The Democratic-led Legislature, gathered for the second day of a special session called by Gov. Kathy Hochul, passed a bill that outlaws guns in a long list of “sensitive locations,” from bars and subways to government buildings and Times Square, and sets other new rules such as required firearms training. That measure was drafted in answer to a June 23 court decision that dismantled New York’s century-old limitation on who may carry concealed handguns outside their homes. Lawmakers also passed a proposed constitutional amendment to protect abortion rights by expanding protections against discrimination. That proposal, which would be put to voters if approved again by the Legislature, was added to the agenda for the special session in the wake of the June 24 court decision overturning the national right to abortion set by the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling.

‘Grover’s Corner’ dedicated with memories and music behind Town Hall in Great Barrington

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/local/grovers-corner-dedicated-with-memories-and-music-behind-town-hall/article_2ee4d66a-fa27-11ec-82c4-534aed5d88c3.html

GREAT BARRINGTON — Amid short bursts of light rain, the voice of the late David Grover emanated from the grandstand behind Town Hall. Singing along was his wife, Kathy Jo, and one of his grandchildren, Althea. With a multi-piece band, they and others who loved the local musician held a memorial concert and park dedication late Saturday morning. Grover, 69, died in November after a car crash, but his legacy thrived at the park around the gazebo, which is now called Grover’s Corner. For decades, Grover sang to children and adults, many of whom are now grown, including Cassandra Johnson, 24, of New York. After joining Kathy Jo at the gazebo to sing a verse of “You Are My Sunshine,” Johnson said she’d watched Grover there as a child, for just about as long as she could remember. She recalled his warmth and generous energy. A musician for about 50 years, Grover toured with Arlo Guthrie, and had his own musical outfit, called the Big Bear Band. He created a PBS television children’s show about music called “Grover’s Corner” in 1989, and a special called “Chanukah at Grover’s Corner,” about the Jewish festival of lights.

NY lawmakers hammer out new gun restrictions in special session

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/06/30/ny-lawmakers-consider-new-gun-restrictions-in-albany-live-updates/65365326007/

The New York Legislature’s extraordinary session kicked off at noon in Albany Thursday, with lawmakers planning to look at further legislation restricting how New Yorkers can carry or handle their firearms. They are discussing New York’s response to a Supreme Court ruling that struck down a component of New York gun law, which required a person show “proper cause” for carrying a concealed handgun. The High Court ruled that the requirement keeps residents for exercising their Second Amendment rights. “We are going to make sure we have the strongest protections possible,” Gov. Kathy Hochul said Wednesday at a media briefing, adding that New York already has some of the strictest gun laws in the nation. But Wednesday, Hochul gave some clues. The bills proposed in the session could narrow the list of acceptable places to carry a concealed gun, banning them from medical or educational buildings, zoos, public transit and other spaces. Other proposals include stronger safe storage laws for vehicles and homes, and strengthening the criteria that would disqualify someone from having a gun, including “a history of dangerous behavior,” Hochul said.

After years of accidents and near-misses, Great Barrington to beef up Main Street crosswalks

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/great-barrington-main-street-route-7-crosswalks-downtown/article_d6c9a124-f7a9-11ec-837d-db819ef780ae.html

Alarmed by accidents and near-misses in Main Street crosswalks over the years, town officials compromised on a plan to add flashers and “refuge” islands to beef up safety on what is also the busy state Route 7. The two Main Street crosswalks to be revamped are at Railroad Street and just north of Church Street at what is called “Rotary Way.” The Select Board voted unanimously to install three beacons and a raised “refuge island” in the Railroad Street crossing; the Rotary Way crosswalk will feature a smaller, painted island and two beacons. The work schedule for the project is uncertain. It still requires refinement and approvals from federal and state agencies, said Christopher Rembold, assistant town manager/town planner. The exact cost is unclear; voters this month approved the work as part of a $1.9 million package of street improvements around town. The project also calls for the crosswalks to get a coating of “high visibility” paint. Engineers from Beta Inc. also suggested a possible narrowing to one lane at the Rotary Way crossing to slow traffic, but some board members thought this would clog traffic unnecessarily.

Bring on Summer Art at Trinity Juried Art Show Reception, Friday July 1, 5-7 pm and Show on weekends.  July 2-17 

You are invited to bring on summer by attending the Art at Trinity Summer Juried Art Show Opening Reception and Awards Friday, July 1 from 5-7PM.  This is the first opening since the start of Covid and the  Reception is scheduled to be a grand celebration! The show will also include fine art, small works, unframed art and greeting cards. The Reception will include the awarding of prizes and meeting many of the winning artists. The jurors were Stephanie Haboush Plunkett, deputy director and chief curator of the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass.; and Lynn Kearcher, an author and artists assistant in Sharon, CT. Attendees will be voting for the People’s Choice Award and the winner of that will also be announced.  The reception and the show are free of charge. The ongoing show dates are July 2-17 Noon to 4 PM Saturdays and Sundays only. The Trinity Gallery is located at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 484 Lime Rock Rd. Lime Rock, CT.

Cornwall CT

July 1 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm EDT

Summer Music Fest

Music on the Green July 1 from 6 to 8 P.M. Music by the Zolla Boys, Food Truck, Games, and Crafts. Come have fun before fireworks! August Music Fest!

Lime Rock Park

Salisbury Rotary Club fireworks at Lime Rock. Gates open at 6:00PM with the show commencing at dark, usually around 9:15. This year will feature food and drink vendors from around the area, face painting and other activities. Admission is $20/car, $5 for walk-ins and $50 for buses.

Eric Sloane Museum open house on July 2 

The Eric Sloane Museum plans to celebrate 50 years of the museum’s operation on July 2 with free admission, live music and food. Historic craft demonstrations and guest speakers will be on the schedule. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 4. 

Connecticut secretary of state to resign, citing ill husband

Connecticut secretary of state to resign, citing ill husband

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill will leave office six months before her third term ends, she is resigning Thursday, effective at noon, to spend more time with her husband, who is facing serious health problems. Merrill said that it was a hard decision, considering this is an election year, and that she feels responsible for making sure it runs smoothly. However, Merrill, 73, said she can no longer juggle the job and helping care for her husband. Merrill’s husband, Dr. Stephen Leach, 78, has been living with Parkinson’s disease for years and has been dealing with various health setbacks more recently, she said.

Four towns approve Region 20 merger; new school opens in 2024-25

Four towns approve Region 20 merger; new school opens in 2024-25

Voters in Litchfield and the Region 6 towns of Warren, Morris and Goshen made history Tuesday by approving a school merger that will be the first of its kind in Connecticut. Referendums in each town resulted in support for the creation of a new Region 20 district, an unprecedented partnership between a municipal district and a regional district in the state. Each town had to approve the proposal for it to move forward, and Litchfield, Goshen and Warren did so convincingly. The measure passed in Litchfield, 1,378-392, Goshen, 500-283, and Warren, 231-146. Morris voters provided some suspense by green-lighting the plan, 283-228. Region 20 will include a grades 9-12 high school at Wamogo Regional High School and a grades 6-8 middle school at Litchfield High School/Middle School. Both schools will be renamed as part of a plan to forge a new identity for the district. The new district will open for the 2024-25 school year.

Assembly veterans Cahill, Abinanti lose Democratic primaries to challengers backed by Working Families party

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/state/2022/06/29/primary-ny-assembly-kevin-cahill-upset-by-sarahan-shrestha-democratic-nomination/65364359007/

A pair of longtime state lawmakers from the Hudson Valley were soundly defeated on Tuesday in primary challenges waged by fellow Democrats who were backed by the progressive Working Families Party. Sarahana Shrestha, a climate activist and political newcomer, beat Assemblymen Kevin Cahill by more than 500 votes for the party nomination in the 103rd Assembly District in Ulster and Dutchess counties, according to complete but unofficial results from the state Board of Elections. Cahill is a Kingston Democrat who has been in the Assembly for 26 years. And in the 92nd District in central Westchester County, County Legislator MaryJane Shimsky prevailed by nearly 1,000 votes in her party challenge against Assemblyman Tom Abinanti, who has held his seat for 12 years.

Salisbury CT
Special Planning & Zoning Meeting
Thursday, June 30
5:00pm
Special Conservation Commission Meeting
6:00pm
Info Session for Railroad St Property

Kent CT
June 30, 2022 – 10:30am
P&Z Commission and POCD Sub Committee Special Meeting
June 30, 2022 – 7:00pm

Salisbury plans July 4 festivities 

Independence Day will be celebrated at the town Grove in Lakeville on Monday, July 4. The annual festivities will begin at noon with the reading of the Declaration of Independence by Heman Allen (a.k.a. Lou Bucceri). Both Heman and his famous brother, Ethan Allen, lived in Salisbury for a period of time. Following the reading, the Salisbury Band will entertain the crowd. Pack a picnic lunch or enjoy hot dogs and soft drinks sold by members of EXTRAS, the after-school and summer day-care program in Salisbury. There is no rain date.

Talk on trains 

https://tricornernews.com

The second talk of the season for the Falls Village-Canaan Historical Society’s 1st Tuesday at 7 summer talk series is legendary trainman Peter McLachlan’s photo Collection with Rick Selva and Dave Jacobs, on Tuesday, July 5, 7 p.m. at the South Canaan Meetinghouse, 12 Rte. 63 in Falls Village. Historical Society board member Dave Jacobs, along with Perry Gardner, have been scanning and editing the well known trainman’s slides for several years. The collection of approximately 30,000 slides, were all taken by McLachan over his long career with the various railroads that operated locally. The event is open to the public. 

Bear-feeding ordinance on town agenda in Salisbury

https://tricornernews.com

An ordinance prohibiting the feeding of bears is on the agenda for a special town meeting Thursday, July 7 at 7 p.m. (online). The other items are to approve the five-year Local Capital Improvement Program (LOCIP) plan and to sell 17 Perry St. to the Salisbury Housing Trust for $1. 

Part-time lake patrols aim to keep peace on Twin Lakes

https://tricornernews.com

In response to ongoing noise complaints from lakefront property owners on Twin Lakes, the town has reinstituted a part-time police patrol headed by newly appointed Salisbury Resident State Trooper Will Veras and aided by a staff of two retired law enforcement officers. The announcement was made during a membership meeting of the Twin Lakes Association (TLA) on Saturday, June 18 at Camp Isola Bella, attended by about 50 people, including First Selectman Curtis Rand. Rand, Veras and TLA President Grant Bogle fielded questions and complaints, and explained how the program will roll out this summer, with a goal of having it fully implemented next season. Salisbury lost its town constable due to state cutbacks, forcing TLA members and the town to scramble this year for a way to keep peace while allowing safe recreation on the lake.

NECC opens Early Learning Program

The North East Community Center (NECC) is accepting applications for its new Early Learning Program, to be held at the site of the former Astor Head Start program in Millerton. This program aims to serve children between 18 and 36 months of age. Families may now send their applications to ELP@neccmillerton.org or contact Raina at 518-789-4259, ext. 110 with questions.

Twilight at the Pond concerts 2022 

The North East-Millerton Library’s 2022 Twilight at the Pond concert series at Rudd Pond continues throughout the month of August. Among the featured concerts, the library will present: • Northwest Passage on Saturday, July 9, at 6:30 p.m. • Roger & Lenny Ten Mile on Saturday, July 23, at 6:30 p.m. • The Mia Brazilian Jazz Ensemble on Saturday, Aug. 13, at 6 p.m. For more information  https://.nemillertonlibrary org or call 518-789-4259.

Wassaic Park plans

https://tricornernews.com

After initiating a conversation with the public about Wassaic Park at its June 9 meeting, the Amenia Recreation Commission (ARC) continued exploring ideas to improve the park among other business items at its 7 p.m. meeting on Thursday, June 23. In addition to all five ARC members, Amenia Town Board liaisons Vicki Doyle and Leo Blackman attended along with five members of the public in the Amenia Town Hall auditorium. The ARC accepted Chris Milano’s resignation as ARC chair due to time restraints and elected Winters to serve as chair; Milano will continue his time on the ARC as a member. Notifying the public about the ARC’s discussion via the “Wassaic Amenia Community Forum” Facebook page, Winters said he plans to ask the Town Board to also expand its membership from five to seven members, as the ARC often has a hard time reaching a quorum, needed to vote.

Salisbury Bank offers free community shred ‘Drive-thru’ day

AT LAKEVILLE, CT BRANCH ON JULY 9 th

Lakeville, CT – June 24, 2022 – Salisbury Bank is continuing its initiative to fight against identity theft while
building community goodwill by sponsoring a free Shred Event and Food Drive. “Identity theft continues to be a concern for individuals and businesses. One way you can ensure that thieves don’t gain access to information that could be confidential is shredding documents with personal information,” stated Amy Raymond, Executive Vice President and Chief Retail Banking Officer at Salisbury Bank. Community Shred “Drive-thru” Day is open to anyone, and will be held at the Lakeville branch – 5 Bissell Street, Lakeville, CT on Saturday, July 9th , from 9 AM to Noon. Please consider bringing a non-perishable donation as well – local pantries need a variety of donations including: canned goods, powdered milk, whole-grain cereals, kitchen spices, macaroni and cheese, pancake/cake mix, peanut butter, condiments, pasta, granola/oatmeal, and tomato sauce. Household necessities such as paper towels, diapers, wipes, socks, feminine hygiene products, shampoo, and soap are also appreciated. All shredded paper will be recycled and all collected items will be donated directly to local food pantries.

Planned Parenthood preparing for out-of-state patients seeking care

https://www.wfsb.com/2022/06/28/planned-parenthood-preparing-out-of-state-patients-seeking-care/

Planned Parenthood of Southern New England said they are taking steps to prepare their facilities for an influx of out-of-state patients seeking care that is now heavily restricted or banned in other states. Senator Richard Blumenthal visited Planned Parenthood’s New Haven health center Tuesday, speaking directly to staff. The senator thanked them for their work and vowed to lend his full support to have continued care for women in the state of Connecticut. “Their resolve and resilience sends a powerful message to the forces of oppression in this country that would strip women of their freedom to decide when and whether to have children, the supreme court has said that power should be in the hands of government officials not women, the folks here say you still have care no matter what, Connecticut will continue to be a safe harbor,” said Blumenthal. The new piece of reproductive rights legislation signed into law in May will take effect this Friday, July 1.

New heating oil laws kick in July 1st in Conn.

https://www.wfsb.com/2022/06/29/new-heating-oil-laws-kick-july-1st-conn/

As of July 1, the rules for heating oil are changing in Connecticut. A new law requires biodiesel to be mixed in with heating oil. As of July 1, only a small portion of biodiesel must be added to home heating oil, but by 2035 it will have to be 50-50. This law being put into effect is the first step Connecticut is making to break away from the dependence on foreign oil. Cooking oil from restaurants will be mixed with traditional ultra-low sulfur heating oil. This will provide a greener, cleaner, and more renewable oil. “The plan is that now everyone in Connecticut which is about half the homes in Connecticut that heat with oil will now be receiving a green renewable carbon fuel,” says Chris Herb, president, and CEO of Connecticut Energy. “This is not a new fuel. This is a fuel that has been developed for decades. It’s just hit prime time in terms of production,” says Herb. Biodiesel is made in Connecticut. It starts as cooking oils such as corn, olive, canola, and vegetable. Instead of throwing the original grease out, it’s canned and taken to New Haven. After it’s turned into fuel, it will be distributed via the roughly 600 home heating oil companies in Connecticut. “Basically, your licensed service technician is going to do your annual maintenance. There is no capital investment, there is no added cost. We just pour it in, and we get the environmental benefits,” says Herb. The price or a barrel of biodiesel fuel is just about the same as crude oil. Savings won’t kick in until we are less reliant on international fuel. The competitive marketplace will show a reduction in fuel price for the consumer.

NY primary: Kathy Hochul easily wins Democratic nomination for governor

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/06/28/ny-primary-governor-kathy-hochul-democrat-victory-over-tom-suozzi-gop-lee-zeldin-andrew-giuliani/7758919001/

It was a good night for New York’s incumbent chief executive Tuesday, as Gov. Kathy Hochul clinched a decisive win in the Democratic gubernatorial primary. With just under half of New York’s election districts reporting unofficial results, Hochul took 64% of the vote, heartily besting her challengers, Long Island congressman Tom Suozzi and New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams. The Associated Press called the race at around 9:30 p.m. “Are you with me when we stand up for real New York values, our hard earned rights, that we’ve had from Seneca Falls all the way to Stonewall?” Hochul said jubilantly from the stage at the state Democratic Party’s election night gathering Tuesday. “Are you with me? Because I’m with all of you. Let’s do this together.” Lt. Gov. Antonio Delgado also won his primary, according to the Associated Press, taking 57% of the unofficial vote tally with just under half of districts reporting. His challengers for the role included Diana Reyna and Ana Maria Archila.  “We need public servants, who will fight to unite folks around a common cause and deliver results,” Delgado said Tuesday night. “New York has always led the country in moments like these. New York has always been ahead of the national curve, setting the pace. Now more than ever, we need New York to hold the line. And in Gov. Hochul, New York has a leader for these times.” In a rare crowded Republican primary, Rep. Lee Zeldin, representing the 1st congressional district on Long Island, beat out a slate of opponents and took about 43% of the Republican vote across the state, according to the Associated Press and an unofficial tally with about two-thirds of districts reporting.  Andrew Giuliani, the son of former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani who enjoyed a modest surge in support as the primary approached, was neck and neck with Zeldin earlier in the night, and held about 25% of the vote when the race was called for Zeldin.

Great Barrington residents file complaint against board, ask state to overturn short-term rental vote

https://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/southern_berkshires/great-barrington-short-term-rentals-airbnb-berkshires/article_449b5382-f71e-11ec-909a-7ffe4bc86a6f.html

Turmoil over short-term rental rules resurrected this month after residents filed a complaint against the Select Board, alleging a tainted lead-up to the town’s approval of its bylaw should overturn that vote. The complaint, filed on June 17, says that when two board members met alone with a town staff member to hammer out a revised version of the regulations, it created “a de facto subcommittee” that did not meet public noticing requirements and so did not allow for the public’s presence. The board approved, 3-1, a draft of its response to the complaint, denying the open meeting law violation. The matter will ultimately be adjudicated by the Attorney General’s Office. Turmoil over short-term rental rules resurrected this month after residents filed a complaint against the Select Board, alleging a tainted lead-up to the town’s approval of its bylaw should overturn that vote. The complaint, filed on June 17, says that when two board members met alone with a town staff member to hammer out a revised version of the regulations, it created “a de facto subcommittee” that did not meet public noticing requirements and so did not allow for the public’s presence. The board approved, 3-1, a draft of its response to the complaint, denying the open meeting law violation. The matter will ultimately be adjudicated by the Attorney General’s Office. Pruhenski also noted a similar situation in Brookline as precedent, in which the Attorney General’s Office found that no subcommittee had been created. It was 10 mostly vocal opponents of the short-term rental bylaw that joined on to the complaint filed by Daniel Seitz and Anthony Segalla. The complaint points to two meetings in which board members agreed that Davis and Bannon would work on the bylaw with Rembold.

Cornwall residents express concern over wastewater management proposal

Cornwall residents express concern over wastewater management proposal

CORNWALL — Sixty people spent their Saturday evening at a special town meeting to discuss the proposed wastewater management project for West Cornwall. After 90 minutes, the session was adjourned to a referendum on July 9. The issue has been in the forefront for six years, when a study committee was convened to seek a solution to the many substandard wells and septic systems in the village. An upgrade was seen not only for environmental reasons — to maintain the quality of water in the nearby Housatonic River and Mill Brook — but to help revitalize an area that many had dubbed “a ghost town.” The project, which would cover the main street of the village, along with a few side streets, has a price tag of $6.3 million. The town secured a $3 million grant from the federal Community Grant Project to help offset the costs. The remainder would be secured through loans and/or grants from the USDA and municipal bonding. Board of Finance Chairman Joe Pryor explained that several bond projects will be sunsetting as the new bonds come into effect. He said the new bonds would be between 20 and 40 years. First Selectman Gordon M. Ridgway added that additional taxes may be seen if buildings are expanded and new businesses come to town. Todd Piker, chairman of the wastewater study committee, said experts in the field agree the substandard systems pose a clear danger to the river. Committee members are confident that installing a membrane bioreactor and dischargers will reflect state-of-the-art technology and that the river could be healthier because of the presence of a treatment plant. Liz Sawicki had several questions, including the closeness of existing wells to the new system. Cathy Weber, a sanitarian with Torrington Area Health District, said, “Any siting of a system takes into account the proximity of wells. When hooked up to the new system, there is an allowance for increased space.” Tom Bechtle, a resident of West Cornwall, has constantly expressed concern that the placement of the plant has not been divulged. He urged the study committee to be forthcoming about the location or at least those that are being discussed. Mark Wilson had the same concerns. He said assumptions such as existing terrible water quality and that West Cornwall “will be magically revitalized” aren’t true. Ridgway said there is no designated spot at this time. Extensive engineering must be done on all those being considered. “We agree with your concerns. We’re not saying we have all the answers. We won’t know the total costs until it’s designed and the bids are in.” Actor Sam Waterston wondered about the noise and odor that may emanate from the plant, and was reassured that won’t be a problem.

Kent invites applicants for ARPA grants

Kent invites applicants for ARPA grants

 Applications are now available for Kent residents, businesses and nonprofits seeking grants from the town of Kent for relief suffered during the COVID-19 pandemic, following the approval Wednesday by the selectmen of the American Rescue Plan Act report and the ratification of many of the committee’s recommendations. The applications will be accepted from July 1 through Aug. 30 and links are available online at http://www.townofkentct.org. The selectmen agreed to have Treasurer Barbara Herbst process the grant applications. All information pertaining to the application process can be found on the town website. Selectman Rufus P. de Rham expressed some concerns about doing the applications on a first come, first served basis. “Everybody needs to have an equal starting point,” de Rham said. He also worried about residents who may struggle filling out the application. ARPA Needs Assessment Subcommittee Chairman Connie Manes said that her group feels strongly that the process needs to start quickly. The committee wants there be equity, which is why the application was developed. The selectmen agreed to ratify the six funding categories and the amounts suggested for individuals and families, local businesses, nonprofit organizations, municipal projects, infrastructure upgrades and the Kent Volunteer Fire Department. KVFD will be given $80,000 for a Next-Gen communications system, fitness room upgrades, a new stair chair and Automatic External Defibrillators. The town was allocated $821,855 in federal funds. The selectmen decided to hold off on the municipal programs and infrastructure spending in order to review the recommendations in more detail. However, they did agree to spend $26,000, giving it to the Kent Board of Education for an after-school and summer education enrichment program. School board chairman Scott Trabucco said the board is very close to being able to launch the summer program.

NY cities fighting for safer drinking water praise new warning on toxic ‘forever’ chemicals

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/2022/06/27/how-epa-targeting-forever-chemicals-water-affect-new-york/7662176001/

They’re called “forever chemicals” because it’s just so hard to get rid of them. Collectively known as PFAS (per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances), they are found in everyday kitchen products like food packaging and nonstick frying pans, as well as carpets, water-proof jackets and the foam used to fight fires. Once they degrade, they contaminate the environment and seep into drinking water supplies, creating a litany of health concerns. Through the years, leading environmental groups have tied them to cancer, low birthweights, thyroid function, and other ailments. And this month, in a nod to growing concerns, the nation’s leading environmental watchdog — the Environmental Protection Agency — took the rare step of announcing that allowable levels for PFAS in drinking water it established six years ago were far too high. It issued new health advisories for PFOA and PFOS — two of the most widely used of thousands of PFAS — placing their acceptable drinking water levels near zero, a level so low it currently can’t be measured. In 2016, the EPA had set the health risk level at 70-parts per trillion. New York went even further four years later, establishing a ten-parts per trillion standard for the chemicals in drinking water. “The EPA’s announcement is a game changer,” said Rob Hayes, the director of Clean Water for Environmental Advocates NY. “And it should have huge ripple effects in terms of how New York regulates PFAS in drinking water. EPA science makes clear and confirms what advocates have said for a long time – that there is no safe level of exposure to PFOA and PFOS in drinking water.”

Assembly member Didi Barrett instrumental in helping the Village of Millerton receive a grant for 4 Multi Modal Solar Crosswalk Signs.

After months of planning one set of these wonderful signs, have been installed at the Harlem Valley Rail Trail and are fully functional. The other three sets will be installed and functional in the coming weeks. The additional locations will be at the crosswalk near Oakhurst Diner and the S. Center Street intersection, at the crosswalk at the Millerton Movie House and intersection of Dutchess Avenue and the final set, at the newly created crosswalk at the Millerton Library and intersection of Central Avenue. After months of planning one set of these wonderful signs, have been installed at the Harlem Valley Rail Trail and are fully functional. The other three sets will be installed and functional in the coming weeks. The additional locations will be at the crosswalk near Oakhurst Diner and the S. Center Street intersection, at the crosswalk at the Millerton Movie House and intersection of Dutchess Avenue and the final set, at the newly created crosswalk at the Millerton Library and intersection of Central Avenue.

State employee retirement wave coming

State employee retirement wave coming

HARTFORD – More than 4,000 state employees have already submitted retirement papers this year before more costly pension changes take effect July 1. The anticipated retirement wave is shaping up to be big, but not the possible tsunami that earlier forecasts warned could see as much as 40% of full-time state employees retire. State officials are expecting employees will submit retirement notices right up until the window closes so the final number remains to be determined. Meanwhile, Gov. Ned Lamont and administration officials are watching the numbers and waiting. “Right now, the numbers are up compared to where we are traditionally, but a lot less than the number of people who are eligible to retire,” Lamont said. The pace of retirements this year is running well ahead of the 1,980 annual average for the last five years. There were 2,656 retirements in 2021, the most in any year since 2011. What is clear now is that the final count will rival the 4,749 retirements in 2009, the last time that a retirement incentive program was offered under then-Gov. M. Jodi Rell to help close projected state deficits in the billions of dollars. Some 3,800 employees took advantage of the program.

Gillibrand calls for inclusion of a gender inclusive marker on Federal IDs

https://imby.com/post/2961

Third Gender Marker An Important Step Toward Equality For Transgender, Intersex, And Non-binary Americans

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand led a bicameral letter with Senator Baldwin (D-WI), Congressman Ro Khanna (D-CA), and nearly two dozen colleagues in support of a permanent, gender-neutral marker (“X”) option for all federal IDs. Establishing a third gender marker as an option for identification is an important step toward equality for transgender, intersex, and non-binary Americans and will help ensure all individuals can obtain identification that accurately reflects who they are, regardless of gender identity.

Mystery group tosses wrench in Cornwall plans

Mystery group tosses wrench in Cornwall plans

CORNWALL — Who are the Friends of Cornwall? People want to know. With the referendum to vote on a wastewater system approaching, flyers from this group have been sent to 1,500 homes in town urging a “no” vote on the proposal. The same group set up a website and sent email blasts to various residents with the same message. The movement has raised a stir because of its anonymity and what some say promotes inaccurate information. Many posts on the town’s Cornwall Community Network have condemned a lack of courage for standing behind such convictions. The plan calls for installing a $6.3 million facility to address the substandard septic systems and wells in the village. A study group working for the past six years believes the upgrades will increase economic vitality in the area, and allow for expansions of businesses and homes. The flyer states the proposal is not the answer. It states that a soil infiltration system should be considered because it doesn’t deplete groundwater, requires less maintenance, would need a smaller building and less land, and is generally less expensive. The document states, “The treated sewage with household chemicals, pharmaceuticals and other substances of concern will go directly into the Housatonic River. Not only is this environmentally irresponsible, but if regulations were to become more stringent about what we can discharge into the Housatonic River, the entire system could be deemed noncompliant. … The engineering report contains no data or serious analyses of any alternatives to the proposed sewer system. It is so lacking in crucial information that it has been valued at $7,500, much less than the $52,000 that we voted to allocate to this study in August 2016.” Another claim is all properties within the sewer district may be required to connect to the system. The study committee has said all along that no one will be forced to connect. During the Board of Selectmen’s meeting Tuesday, First Selectman Gordon M. Ridgway addressed the issue, saying his phone had been ringing off the hook since the flyer appeared. Residents were concerned it was filled with inaccuracies. He did some research and all he could find was that it was sent by an out-of-town printer. He contacted the State Election Enforcement Commission and Town Attorney Perley H. Grimes Jr. because of the lack of attribution. Ridgway then read a letter of response from Grimes, who said assuming Friends of Cornwall consists of more than one individual, he believes it violated at least two statutes: one that requires groups of two or more who produce a communication in opposition to a referendum to include a disclaimer stating who paid for it, and the second requires such a group to register with the town clerk and provide certain information if more than $1,000 is spent trying to influence a referendum. Upon notification by the town clerk of violations, the enforcement commission is charged with investigating the case. Grimes said the penalty for not including a disclaimer could be a fine from $200 to $2,000 or imprisonment for not more than one year, or both. The penalty for not registering with the town clerk could be more serious, Grimes said. Ridgway said he doesn’t expect all people to agree, but there are standards to follow in the public eye.

New York Election 2022

June 28 primary

Vote in person on Election Day — Tuesday, June 28

Polls Open:

6:00 am – 9:00 pm

Poll Locations:

Find your polling site at voterlookup.elections.ny.gov

Crime is surging in New York City. But it dropped in the Hudson Valley

https://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/local/2022/06/23/ny-data-show-violent-crime-fell-hudson-valley-rising-nyc/7627543001/

Politicians have painted rampant crime as a widespread crisis that has made New York more dangerous, with Republicans blaming Democratic policies for a violence spike. But new data reported by police agencies and released by the state this month show that the number of violent crimes committed in the seven-county Hudson Valley region actually dipped by 0.7% last year, and was 18% lower in 2021 than in 2017. Statewide figures from the state Division of Criminal Justice Services do show troubling hikes in violent crime in the last two years in New York City and some upstate cities, including Rochester, Syracuse and Albany. Annual totals also rose in suburban Nassau County on Long Island. But that was not the case in the Hudson Valley, a region of 2.4 million people that stretches from the urban northern edge of New York City to the wilderness of the Catskills. Total violent crime in those seven counties fell to 3,557 in 2021 from 4,362 in 2017. Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro, a Republican candidate for Congress in a neighboring district, had held a press conference in Albany two weeks earlier to denounce the latest amendment to bail reform as inadequate, and to demand its repeal. “Democrats spent the last two years calling cashless bail a success,” Molinaro said in a statement afterward. “I’m not sure how a dramatic increase in violent crime constitutes success.”

USA TODAY Network Hudson Valley asked both Schmitt and Molinaro to clarify which areas they meant when talking about rising crime and to discuss the new data showing that Hudson Valley crime had fallen. Schmitt’s office issued a statement from him in response that instead cited news coverage and denounced New York’s criminal justice reforms as misguided and dangerous. “Every day there’s another headline documenting the crime epidemic in New York State,” Schmitt said. Molinaro issued a statement suggesting that Hudson Valley crime tallies had fallen because fewer victims were reporting crimes as a result of state policies, which he said had “demoralized and defunded our police, disarmed our DA’s, and disincentivized law enforcement.”